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Martin Luther King, Jr. was a Baptist minister and civil rights leader. He worked to make America a more fair, tolerant, and equal nation. He was one of the main leaders of the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s. Because of this movement, civil rights laws were passed to protect voting rights and end racial segregation in the United States. In recognition of his tireless efforts to win civil rights for all people through nonviolent means, Americans celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day on the third Monday in January.

Martin Luther King, Jr. was an important leader in U.S. history. Prospective citizens may be asked about Martin Luther King, Jr. and civil rights during the naturalization test. “What did Martin Luther King, Jr. do?” and “What movement tried to end racial discrimination?” are two questions on the civics test.

For Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, we want to highlight some of the USCIS resources for learners and teachers that are related to this important day.

Learners

USCIS has educational materials to help you learn about the United States and prepare for the naturalization process. Here are several products that talk about Martin Luther King, Jr.: 

  • 100 Civics Questions and Answers with MP3 Audio
    This is the official list of civics questions and answers on the naturalization test in MP3 audio format.
  • Naturalization Self Test
    This online practice test allows you to test your knowledge of U.S. history and government.
  • Preparing for the Oath: U.S. History and Civics for Citizenship
    This web resource provides online videos and activities on the 100 civics questions from the naturalization test and highlights museum objects from the Smithsonian Institution. Visit the “Rights,” “Famous Citizens,” “The 1900s,” and “Symbols & Holidays” themes for information on civil rights and Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Learn About the United States: Quick Civics Lessons for the Naturalization Test
    This study booklet will help you prepare for the civics and English portions of the naturalization interview. It contains the 100 civics questions on the naturalization test with background information and vocabulary from the English portions of the naturalization test.
  • A Promise of Freedom: An Introduction to U.S. History and Civics for Immigrants 
    This 12-minute film focuses on the history and founding of our nation and the important rights and responsibilities of U.S. citizenship.
  • The Citizen's Almanac
    This publication includes information on prominent foreign-born Americans, presidential quotes on citizenship, patriotic songs and poems, and several of our essential founding documents, including the Bill of Rights. On page 41, you will find excerpts from Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech.

Teachers

In addition to the products highlighted above, USCIS offers free online tools and materials for educators and volunteers. Some examples include:

  • Lesson Plans and Activities
    Visit this page to find lesson plans, student handouts, and answer keys on a variety of topics, including these beginning level lessons that discuss Martin Luther King, Jr.:
    • Fighting for Our Rights
    • American Symbols and Celebrations
  • Preparing for the Oath: U.S. History and Civics for Citizenship
    This web resource, described above, also has a “Teachers” section with teacher guides. The guides provide strategies and handouts for each theme. For Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, be sure to visit the teacher guides on “Rights,” “Famous Citizens,” “The 1900s,” and “Symbols & Holidays”.
  • A Promise of Freedom: An Introduction to U.S. History and Civics for Immigrants
    This 12-minute film focuses on the history and founding of our nation and the important rights and responsibilities of U.S. citizenship. Accompanying the video is a discussion booklet that aims to encourage discussion and review of the basic concepts of American democracy outlined in the film.
  • Citizenship Foundation Skills and Knowledge Clusters 
    This booklet highlights the knowledge and skills needed for students to be successful on the naturalization interview and test. Refer to pages 5 and 7 for information about where Martin Luther King, Jr. can be included in a citizenship curriculum.