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An employee may present a receipt for the application of a birth certificate issued by a State, county, municipal authority or territory of the United States, if he/she is not in possession of the actual document because it was lost, stolen or damaged. The receipt is valid for 90 days after which the employee must present a certified copy of the actual birth certificate. A receipt showing that a person has applied for an initial birth certificate is unacceptable.

Last Reviewed/Updated: 
11/25/2014

Such Social Security cards are not acceptable document for Form I-9.  You should ask the employee to provide another document to establish his or her employment authorization.

Last Reviewed/Updated: 
03/27/2014

In order to be acceptable, a Native American tribal document should be issued by a tribe recognized by the U.S. Federal Government. Because federal recognition of tribes can change over time, to determine if the tribe is federally recognized, please check the Bureau of Indian Affairs website at www.bia.gov.

Last Reviewed/Updated: 
03/27/2014

Yes. You may make a copy of the Certification of Naturalization for the purposes of Form I-9.

Last Reviewed/Updated: 
03/27/2014

Yes. The Certificate of Naturalization (Form N-550 or N-570) is an acceptable List C, #8 employment authorization document issued by the Department of Homeland Security. These documents were previously issued by the Immigration and Naturalization Service.

Last Reviewed/Updated: 
03/27/2014

A Certificate of Live Birth may qualify as a birth certificate (No. 4 on List C of the Lists of Acceptable Documents) if it is an original or a certified copy that is issued by a state, county, municipal authority, or outlying possession of the United States and bears an official seal. Versions of birth certificates can vary greatly based on the issuing authority and year of birth.

Last Reviewed/Updated: 
03/27/2014

Yes, these documents are acceptable for Form I-9. 

Last Reviewed/Updated: 
03/27/2014

Each of the 564 federally recognized tribes may issue its own unique tribal document based on private tribal information. USCIS does not have examples of these tribal documents nor can it provide guidelines on specific tribal documents. 

Last Reviewed/Updated: 
03/27/2014

A birth certificate issued by the Panama Canal Zone in 1968 is not an acceptable List C document because the zone is not a State, county, municipal authority, or an outlying possession of the United States. 

Last Reviewed/Updated: 
03/27/2014

No. However, the TWIC card is an acceptable List B identity document.

Last Reviewed/Updated: 
03/27/2014

Yes. There are currently 50 different versions of the Social Security card, all of which may be valid for employment. Visit the Social Security website to see the chart that lists the changes in the SSN card through the years.

Cards that are NOT acceptable List C documents may include any one of the following annotations:

  • NOT VALID FOR EMPLOYMENT.
  • VALID FOR WORK ONLY WITH INS AUTHORIZATION.
  • VALID FOR WORK ONLY WITH DHS AUTHORIZATION.
Last Reviewed/Updated: 
07/28/2014

Yes. A signature on the card is not required for the card to be valid. You may accept an unsigned Social Security card as long as the card reason­ably appears to be genuine and to relate to the person presenting it.

Last Reviewed/Updated: 
03/27/2014

The only birth certificate acceptable for Form I-9 purposes must be an original or certified copy of a birth certificate issued by a state, county, municipal authority or outlying possession of the United States, bearing an official seal. USCIS cannot comment on whether or not a particular hospital is authorized to issue a birth certificate that meets the regulatory requirements.

Last Reviewed/Updated: 
03/24/2014