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World War II

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Overview of INS History
Early American
Immigration Policies
Origins of the Federal
Immigration Service
Origins of the Federal
Naturalization Service
Mass Immigration
and WWI
Era of Restriction
World War II
Post-War Years
Late Twentieth Century
Post-9/11
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Photo of Actress Anna Lee giving fingerprints for Alien Registration, 1940.The threat of war in Europe, and a growing view of immigration as a national security rather than an economic issue, reshaped the Immigration and Naturalization Service’s (INS) mission. In 1940, Presidential Reorganization Plan Number V moved the INS from the Department of Labor to the Department of Justice.

The United States’ entry into World War II brought additional change as many Service personnel enlisted in the Armed Forces. This left INS short of experienced staff. At the same time, INS Headquarters temporarily moved to Philadelphia for the course of the war.

Aiding the War Effort
New national security duties led to the INS’ rapid growth through World War II. The agency’s workforce doubled from approximately 4,000 to 8,000 employees as INS instituted the following programs in support of the war effort:
 

During the war the INS was relieved the responsibility of enforcing the Chinese Exclusion Act, which Congress repealed in 1943. Other war-time developments included conversion to a new record-keeping system and implementation of the Nationality Act of 1940.

 

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Last Reviewed/Updated: 09/27/2013