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USCIS Begins Accepting Requests for Consideration of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals

Release Date: August 15, 2012

Agency successfully meets 60-day implementation date

WASHINGTON— Today, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced that it will begin accepting requests, effective immediately, for consideration of deferred action for childhood arrivals. On June 15, Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano announced that certain people who came to the United States as children and meet other key guidelines may request, on a case-by-case basis, consideration of deferred action.

“USCIS has developed a rigorous review process for deferred action requests under guidelines issued by Secretary Napolitano,” said USCIS Director Alejandro Mayorkas. “Childhood arrivals who meet the guidelines and whose cases are deferred will now be able to live without fear of removal, and be able to more fully contribute their talents to our great nation.”

Deferred action is a discretionary determination to defer removal action of an individual as an act of prosecutorial discretion. USCIS will review requests and make decisions on a case-by-case basis.  While it does not provide lawful status or a pathway to permanent residence or citizenship, individuals whose cases are deferred as part of this process will not be removed from the United States for a two-year period, subject to renewal, and may also apply for employment authorization.

USCIS is committed to ensuring that this new process works within the agency’s mission to administer our nation’s immigration benefits, provide high quality service to the public, and safeguard the integrity of the immigration system.

To learn more about the deferred action for childhood arrivals process, please visit www.uscis.gov/childhoodarrivals or call the USCIS National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283.

 For more information on USCIS and its programs, please visit www.uscis.gov or follow us on Twitter (@uscis), YouTube (/uscis) and the USCIS blog The Beacon.

Last Reviewed/Updated: 08/15/2012