USCIS Policy Manual

VOLUME 12: CITIZENSHIP & NATURALIZATION

PART K: CERTIFICATES OF CITIZENSHIP AND NATURALIZATION

Chapter 1: Purpose and Background


A. Purpose


All applicants who meet the eligibility requirements to derive or acquire citizenship or to become naturalized[1] The Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) defines naturalization as the “conferring of nationality of a state upon a person after birth, by any means whatsoever.” See INA 101(a)(23). Accordingly, any person who obtains citizenship after birth, even if that citizenship is obtained by automatic operation of law, such as under INA 320, is a “naturalized” citizen under the law. For ease of reference, this volume uses the term naturalized citizen to refer to those persons who do not acquire automatically but instead file an Application for Naturalization (Form N-400) and proceed through the naturalization process in their own right. United States citizens are eligible to receive a certificate from USCIS documenting their U.S. citizenship.[2] A person who automatically acquires citizenship may also apply for a U.S. Passport with the Department of State to serve as evidence of his or her U.S. citizenship. The burden of proof is on the applicant to establish that he or she has met all of the pertinent eligibility requirements for issuance of a certificate. 




USCIS strictly guards the physical security of the certificates to minimize the unlawful distribution and fraudulent use of certificates.


B. Background 


In general, in order to obtain either a Certificate of Citizenship or a Certificate of Naturalization from USCIS, a person must:


  • File the appropriate form and supporting evidence; 

  • Appear for an interview before an officer, if required;

  • Meet the pertinent eligibility requirements, as evidenced by USCIS approval of the form; and

  • Take the Oath of Allegiance, if required.


USCIS District Directors, Field Office Directors, and other USCIS officers acting on their behalf, have delegated authority to administer the Oath of Allegiance in USCIS administrative oath ceremonies and to issue certificates.[5] See Part J, Oath of Allegiance, Chapter 2, The Oath of Allegiance, Section B, Authority to Administer the Oath [12 USCIS-PM J.2(B)].


C. Legal Authorities


  • INA 310(b)(4)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-9792.html#0-0-0-7613)8 CFR 310(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-30618/0-0-0-30623.html#0-0-0-19373) – Naturalization authority and issuance of certificates

  • INA 332(e)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-10248.html#0-0-0-7933)8 CFR 332(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-32244/0-0-0-32249.html#0-0-0-20237) – Issuance of Certificates of Citizenship and Naturalization

     

  • INA 338(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-10345.html)8 CFR 338(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-32639/0-0-0-32644.html#0-0-0-20521) – Contents and issuance of Certificate of Naturalization

  • INA 340(f)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-10362.html#0-0-0-8029)8 CFR 340(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-32732/0-0-0-32737.html#0-0-0-20579) – Cancellation of certificate after revocation of naturalization

  • INA 341(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-10378.html)8 CFR 341(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-32825/0-0-0-32832.html#0-0-0-20585) – Certificates of Citizenship

  • INA 342(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-10390.html)8 CFR 342(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-32897/0-0-0-32904.html#0-0-0-20619) – Administrative cancellation of certificates, documents, or records


Chapter 2: Certificate of Citizenship


A. Eligibility for Certificate of Citizenship


In order to obtain a Certificate of Citizenship, an applicant submits to USCIS:



  • An Application for Citizenship and Issuance of Certificate Under Section 322 (Form N-600K(http://www.uscis.gov/n-600k)) for a child of a United States citizen residing outside of the United States.


The application must be submitted in accordance with the form instructions and with the appropriate fee.[7] See 8 CFR 103.7. In addition, applications must include any supporting evidence. An Application for Citizenship and Issuance of Certificate Under Section 322 may only be filed if the child is under 18 years of age. An Application for Certificate of Citizenship may be filed either before or after the child turns 18 years of age.


If the person claiming citizenship is 18 years of age or older, the person must establish that he or she has met the eligibility requirements for U.S. citizenship and issuance of the certificate. If the application is for a child under 18 years of age, the person applying on behalf of the child must establish that the child has met the pertinent eligibility requirements.[8] See Part H, Children of U.S. Citizens [12 USCIS-PM H].


B. Contents of Certificate of Citizenship


1. Information about the Applicant on Certificates of Citizenship


The Certificate of Citizenship contains information identifying the person and confirming his or her U.S. citizenship. Specifically, the Certificate of Citizenship contains:


  • USCIS registration number (A-number);


  • Photograph;

  • Signature of applicant; and

  • Other descriptors: sex, date of birth, and height.


2. Additional Information on Certificates of Citizenship


  • Certificate number;

  • Statement by the USCIS Director indicating that the applicant has complied with all the eligibility requirements for citizenship under the laws of the United States;

  • Date on which the person became a U.S. citizen;

  • Date of issuance; and

  • DHS seal and Director’s signature as the authority under which the certificate is issued.


3. Changes to Names or Dates of Birth per Court Order


Change to Date of Birth on Certificate of Citizenship


USCIS recognizes that the dates of birth of children born abroad are not always accurately recorded in the countries in which they were born. For example, an adopted child whose date of birth (DOB) was unknown may have been assigned an estimated DOB, or the DOB may have been incorrectly recorded or translated from a non-Gregorian calendar.[10] Most western countries follow the Gregorian calendar. Other countries follow different calendars including the Hebrew (lunisolar calendar); Islamic (lunar calendar); and Julian (solar calendar). The calendars differ on days, months, and years. 


In these cases, the incorrect or estimated DOB is reported on the child’s foreign record of birth and becomes part of the USCIS record. Once in the United States, parents may obtain medical evidence indicating that the DOB on the foreign record of birth and the USCIS record is incorrect and they may choose to obtain evidence of a corrected DOB from the state of residence.


USCIS will issue a Certificate of Citizenship with the corrected DOB in cases where the applicant, or if the applicant is under age 18, the parent or legal guardian has obtained state-issued document from the child’s state of residence with a corrected DOB.[11] See INA 320(c) (relating to cases where individuals automatically acquire citizenship under INA 320 based on an adoption or re-adoption in the United States), subsection (c) added to INA 320 by the Accuracy for Adoptees Act, Pub. L. 113-74 (Jan. 16, 2014). Cases where the requested DOB would result in the applicant being ineligible for citizenship because the applicant would have aged out should be raised through appropriate channels for consultation with the Office of Chief Counsel (OCC). Additionally, any cases involving particular concerns based on the corrected DOB should also be raised through appropriate channels for consultation with OCC. state-issued document includes a:


  • Court order;

  • Birth certificate;

  • Certificate recognizing the foreign birth;

  • Certificate of birth abroad; or

  • Other similar state vital record issued by the child’s state of residence.


In cases where USCIS has already issued the Certificate of Citizenship, the applicant may request a replacement Certificate of Citizenship with a corrected DOB by filing an Application for Replacement Naturalization/Citizenship Document (Form N-565(http://www.uscis.gov/n-565)) with the appropriate fee.[12] See Chapter 4, Replacement of Certificate of Citizenship or Naturalization [12 USCIS-PM K.4].


Change of Legal Name on Certificate of Citizenship


In general, a Certificate of Citizenship includes an applicant’s full legal name[13] A full legal name includes the person’s first name, middle name(s) (if any), and family name (or surname) without any initials or nicknames. See 6 CFR 37.3; Real ID Act of 2005, Pub. L. 109-13, 49 U.S.C. 30301. as the name appears on the applicant’s foreign record of birth. USCIS will issue a Certificate of Citizenship with a name other than that on the applicant’s foreign record of birth in cases where the applicant, or if the applicant is under age 18, the parent or legal guardian, has obtained a U.S. state court order evidencing a legal name change.[14] See 8 CFR 320.3(b)(1)(ix) and 8 CFR 322.3(b)(1)(xiii). 


If USCIS has already issued the Certificate of Citizenship, the applicant may request a replacement Certificate of Citizenship by filing an Application for Replacement Naturalization/Citizenship Document (Form N-565(http://www.uscis.gov/n-565)) with the appropriate fee.[15] See Chapter 4, Replacement of Certificate of Citizenship or Naturalization [12 USCIS-PM K.4].


USCIS does not assist with the processing of name change petitions through the courts for applicants filing an Application for Certificate of Citizenship (Form N-600(http://www.uscis.gov/n-600)). An applicant, parent, or legal guardian must file a name change petition with the court having jurisdiction over the matter. 


C.   Issuance of Certificate of Citizenship 


In general, USCIS issues a Certificate of Citizenship after an officer approves the person’s application and the person has taken the Oath of Allegiance, if applicable, before a designated USCIS officer. USCIS will not issue a Certificate of Citizenship to a person who has not surrendered his or her Permanent Resident Card (PRC) or Alien Registration Card (ARC) evidencing the person’s lawful permanent residence. If the person established that his or her card was lost or destroyed, USCIS may waive the requirement of surrendering the card.[16] See 8 CFR 341.4. The requirement to surrender the PRC or ARC does not apply to applicants naturalizing under INA 322. 


If USCIS waives the oath requirement for a person, USCIS issues the certificate after approval of his or her application for the certificate. In such cases, USCIS issues the certificate in person or by certified mail to the parent or guardian in cases involving children under 18 years of age, or to the person (or guardian if applicable) in cases involving persons 18 years of age or older.[17] See 8 CFR 341.5. See Part J, Oath of Allegiance, Chapter 3, Oath of Allegiance Modifications and Waivers [12 USCIS-PM J.3].


Chapter 3: Certificate of Naturalization 


A. Eligibility for Certificate of Naturalization


An applicant submits to USCIS an Application for Naturalization (Form N-400(http://www.uscis.gov/n-400)) along with supporting evidence to establish eligibility for naturalization. The application must be submitted in accordance with the form instructions and with appropriate fee.[18] See 8 CFR 103.7. The applicant must establish that he or she has met all of the pertinent naturalization eligibility requirements for issuance of a Certificate of Naturalization.[19] See the relevant Volume 12 part for the specific eligibility requirements pertaining to the particular citizenship or naturalization provision, to include Part D, General Naturalization Requirements [12 USCIS-PM D], Part G, Spouses of U.S. Citizens [12 USCIS-PM G]; and Part I, Military Members and their Families [12 USCIS-PM I].


B. Contents of Certificate of Naturalization


1. Information about the Applicant on Certificates of Citizenship


The Certificate of Naturalization contains certain required information identifying the person and confirming his or her U.S. citizenship through naturalization. Specifically, the Certificate of Naturalization contains:


  • USCIS registration number (A-number);


  • Photograph;

  • Signature of applicant; and

  • Other descriptors: sex, date of birth, and height


2. Additional Information on Certificates of Naturalization


  • Certificate number;

  • Statement by the USCIS Director indicating that the applicant complied with all the eligibility requirements for naturalization under the laws of the United States;

  • Date of issuance, which is the date the holder became a U.S. citizen through naturalization; and

  • DHS seal and Director’s signature as the authority under which the certificate is issued.[21] See INA 338. See 8 CFR 338.


3. Changes to Names per Court Order


Change of Legal Name on Certificate of Naturalization


In general, a Certificate of Naturalization includes an applicant’s full legal name as the name appears on the applicant’s Form N-400(http://www.uscis.gov/n-400).[22] A full legal name includes the person’s first name, middle name(s) (if any), and family name (or surname) without any initials or nicknames. See 6 CFR 37.3; Real ID Act of 2005, Pub. L. 109-13, 49 U.S.C. 30301. Before naturalization, the applicant may present a valid court order or other proof that the applicant has legally changed his or her name in the manner authorized by the law of the applicant’s place of residence. If the applicant submits such evidence, then USCIS will issue the Certificate of Naturalization in the new name. 


If a naturalized individual changes his or her legal name after naturalizing, the individual may file an Application for Replacement Naturalization/Citizenship Document (Form N-565(http://www.uscis.gov/n-565)), together with the required fees and proof of the legal change of name. However, USCIS is prohibited from making any changes to an applicant’s name on a Certificate of Naturalization if the applicant now claims that the name sworn to during the naturalization process was not his or her correct name, unless the applicant obtains a legal name change as described above.[23] See 8 CFR 338.5(e).


C. Issuance of Certificate of Naturalization


In general, USCIS issues a Certificate of Naturalization after an officer approves the Application for Naturalization and the applicant has taken the Oath of Allegiance.[24] See INA 338. See 8 CFR 338. USCIS will not issue a Certificate of Naturalization to a person who has not surrendered his or her Permanent Resident Card (PRC) or Alien Registration Card (ARC) evidencing the person’s lawful permanent residence. If the person established that his or her card was lost or destroyed, USCIS may waive the requirement of surrendering the card.[25] See 8 CFR 338.3. The requirement to surrender the PRC or ARC does not apply to applicants naturalizing under INA 329 who qualify for naturalization without being permanent residents. 


An applicant is not required to take the Oath of Allegiance or appear at the oath ceremony if USCIS waives the oath requirement due to the applicant’s medical disability. In these cases, USCIS issues the certificate in person or by certified mail to the person or his or her legal guardian, surrogate, or designated representative.[26] See Part J, Oath of Allegiance, Chapter 3, Oath of Allegiance Modifications and Waivers [12 USCIS-PM J.3]. 


Chapter 4: Replacement of Certificate of Citizenship or Naturalization


The table below serves as a quick reference guide for requests to replace certificates of citizenship or naturalization. The sections and paragraphs that follow the table provide further guidance.


Basis for Requests of Replacement

Certificate of Citizenship or Naturalization Form N-565

Certificate

Correct USCIS Clerical Error

Date of Birth Correction

No clerical error

Legal Name Change

Lost or Mutilated Certificate

Legal Gender Change

Certificate of Citizenship

Permitted; no fee required

Permitted if correction through U.S. state court order or similar state vital record (fee required)

Permitted if name change through court order or operation of law (fee required)

Permitted

(fee required)


Certificate of Naturalization


Permitted; no fee required

Not permitted (8 CFR 338.5)

Permitted

(fee required)


A. General Requests to Replace Certificate of Citizenship or Naturalization


In general, an applicant submits to USCIS an Application for Replacement Naturalization/Citizenship Document (Form N-565(http://www.uscis.gov/n-565)) to request a replacement Certificate of Citizenship or Certificate of Naturalization. The application must be submitted with the appropriate fee and in accordance with the form instructions.[27] See 8 CFR 103.7.


A person may request a replacement certificate to replace a lost or mutilated certificate. A person may also request a replacement certificate, without fee, in cases where:


  • USCIS issued a certificate that does not conform to the supportable facts shown on the applicant’s citizenship or naturalization application; or



An applicant may submit a request to update his or her name on Certificate of Naturalization based on a name change ordered by a state court with jurisdiction or due to marriage or divorce.[29] See INA 343(c). In addition, an applicant who has legally changed his or her gender may apply for a replacement certificate reflecting the new gender.[30] A request to change the gender on a certificate may also affect the marital status already listed on the certificate. See Adjudicator’s Field Manual (AFM) Chapter 10.22, Document Issuance Involving Status and Identity for Transgender Individuals. If the gender change results in the individual now being in a valid same-sex marriage, then the certificate must reflect his or her marital status as “married.” 


Unless there is a USCIS clerical error, regulations prohibit USCIS from making any changes to a date of birth on a Certificate of Naturalization if the applicant has completed the naturalization process and sworn to the facts of the application, including the DOB.[31] See 8 CFR 338.5(e). The regulation at 8 CFR 338.5(e) specifically provides that USCIS will not deem a request to change a DOB justified if the naturalization certificate contains the DOB provided by the applicant at the time of naturalization. 


B. Replacement of Certificate of Citizenship


An applicant may submit an Application for Replacement Naturalization/Citizenship Document (Form N-565(http://www.uscis.gov/n-565)to request issuance of a replacement Certificate of Citizenship to correct the DOB or name if the applicant has obtained a state-issued document with a corrected DOB or name. Along with his or her application and the appropriate fee, the applicant must submit the court order or other state vital record.[32] See Chapter 2, Certificate of Citizenship, Section B, Contents of Certificate of Citizenship, Subsection 3, Changes to Names or Dates of Birth per Court Order [12 USCIS-PM K.2(B)(3)].


An applicant may submit an Application for Replacement Naturalization/Citizenship Document (Form N-565(http://www.uscis.gov/n-565)to request issuance of a replacement Certificate of Naturalization to correct the date of birth (DOB) if the correction is justified due to USCIS error.[33] See 8 CFR 338.5(a), 8 CFR 338.5(c), and 8 CFR 338.5(e). For pre-1991 judicial naturalization cases, the regulations provide that USCIS can “authorize” the court to make a change on the certificate if it is the result of clerical error. However, USCIS plays a minimal role in these cases. See 8 CFR 338.5(b) and 8 CFR 338.5(e). No filing fee is required when an application is filed based on a USCIS error.


Chapter 5: Cancellation of Certificate of Citizenship or Naturalization


A. Administrative Cancellation of Certificates[34] See Part L, Revocation of Naturalization, Chapter 3, Effects of Revocation of Naturalization [12 USCIS-PM L.3]. A Certificate of Naturalization issued to a person who lawfully filed an Application for Naturalization and proceeded through the naturalization process to the Oath of Allegiance cannot be canceled under INA 342. Officers should consult with local USCIS counsel in such cases.


USCIS is authorized to cancel any Certificate of Citizenship or Certificate of Naturalization in cases where USCIS considers that the certificate was:



USCIS issues the person a written notice of the intention to cancel the certificate. The notice must include the reason or reasons for the intent to cancel the certificate. The person has 60 days from the date the notice was issued to respond with reasons as to why the certificate should not be cancelled or to request a hearing.[36] See 8 CFR 342.1. A cancellation of certificate under this provision only cancels the certificate and does not affect the underlying citizenship status of the person, if any, in whose name the certificate was issued. 


When considering whether to initiate cancellation proceedings, it is important to distinguish between Certificates of Citizenship and Certificates of Naturalization. In general, USCIS issues Certificates of Citizenship to persons who automatically acquire citizenship by operation of law. If it is determined that the person in whose name the Certificate of Citizenship was issued did not lawfully acquire citizenship, USCIS can initiate cancellation proceedings.[37] See INA 342.


However, such a person may have an additional basis upon which to claim automatic acquisition of citizenship. Accordingly, if that person’s Certificate of Citizenship is cancelled by USCIS, but the person subsequently provides evidence that he or she automatically acquired citizenship through some other basis, the cancellation of the first Certificate of Citizenship does not affect the new citizenship claim. 


By contrast, a Certificate of Naturalization cannot be cancelled if issued to a person who lawfully filed an Application for Naturalization and proceeded through the entire naturalization process to the Oath of Allegiance. In such cases, the person obtained citizenship though the entire naturalization process and his or her citizenship status must first be revoked before the Certificate of Naturalization can be cancelled. However, a Certificate of Naturalization illegally or fraudulently obtained by a person who did not lawfully file an Application for Naturalization or who did not proceed through the naturalization process may be cancelled.[38] See INA 342.


B. Cancellation of Certificate after Revocation of Naturalization


If a court revokes a person’s U.S. citizenship obtained through naturalization, the court enters an order revoking the person’s naturalization and cancelling the person’s Certificate of Naturalization. In such cases, the person must surrender his or her Certificate of Naturalization. Once USCIS obtains the court’s order revoking citizenship and cancelling the certificate, USCIS updates its records, including electronic records, and notifies the Department of State of the person’s revocation of naturalization.[39] See Part L, Revocation of Naturalization, Chapter 3, Effects of Revocation of Naturalization [12 USCIS-PM L.3]. All cases relating to cancellation of certificates should be coordinated through the USCIS OCC office with jurisdiction.



Footnotes


1. [^] 

 The Immigration and Nationality Act (INA)(http://www.uscis.gov/laws/act) defines naturalization as the “conferring of nationality of a state upon a person after birth, by any means whatsoever.” See INA 101(a)(23)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-101/0-0-0-195.html#0-0-0-835). Accordingly, any person who obtains citizenship after birth, even if that citizenship is obtained by automatic operation of law, such as under INA 320(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-9983.html), is a “naturalized” citizen under the law. For ease of reference, this volume uses the term naturalized citizen to refer to those persons who do not acquire automatically but instead file an Application for Naturalization (Form N-400(http://www.uscis.gov/n-400)) and proceed through the naturalization process in their own right.

2. [^] 

 A person who automatically acquires citizenship may also apply for a U.S. Passport with the Department of State to serve as evidence of his or her U.S. citizenship.

3. [^] 

 See Part H, Children of U.S. Citizens [12 USCIS-PM H(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume12-PartH.html)].

4. [^] 

 See the relevant Volume 12 [12 USCIS-PM(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume12.html)] part for the specific eligibility requirements pertaining to the particular naturalization provision, to include Part D, General Naturalization Requirements [12 USCIS-PM D(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume12-PartD.html)]; Part G, Spouses of U.S. Citizens [12 USCIS-PM G(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume12-PartG.html)]; and Part I, Military Members and their Families [12 USCIS-PM I(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume12-PartI.html)].

5. [^] 

 See Part J, Oath of Allegiance, Chapter 2, The Oath of Allegiance, Section B, Authority to Administer the Oath [12 USCIS-PM J.2(B)(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume12-PartJ-Chapter2.html#S-B)].

6. [^] 

 This volume uses the terms “acquired” or “derived” citizenship in cases where citizenship automatically attaches to a person regardless of any affirmative action by that person to document his or her citizenship. 

7. [^] 

 See 8 CFR 103.7(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-11630/0-0-0-11638.html#0-0-0-9349).

8. [^] 

 See Part H, Children of U.S. Citizens [12 USCIS-PM H(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume12-PartH.html)].

9. [^] 

 An applicant who was born in Taiwan may indicate Taiwan as the country of birth on their Form N-400 if he or she shows supporting evidence. Such applicants’ Certificates of Citizenship are issued showing Taiwan as country of birth. USCIS does not issue certificates showing “Taiwan, PRC,” “Taiwan, China,” “Taiwan, Republic of China,” or “Taiwan, ROC.” People’s Republic of China (PRC) is the country name used for applicants born in the PRC.

10. [^] 

 Most western countries follow the Gregorian calendar. Other countries follow different calendars including the Hebrew (lunisolar calendar); Islamic (lunar calendar); and Julian (solar calendar). The calendars differ on days, months, and years.

11. [^] 

 See INA 320(c)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-9983.html) (relating to cases where individuals automatically acquire citizenship under INA 320(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-9983.html) based on an adoption or re-adoption in the United States), subsection (c) added to INA 320(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-9983.html) by the Accuracy for Adoptees Act, Pub. L. 113-74 (Jan. 16, 2014). Cases where the requested DOB would result in the applicant being ineligible for citizenship because the applicant would have aged out should be raised through appropriate channels for consultation with the Office of Chief Counsel (OCC). Additionally, any cases involving particular concerns based on the corrected DOB should also be raised through appropriate channels for consultation with OCC.

12. [^] 

 See Chapter 4, Replacement of Certificate of Citizenship or Naturalization [12 USCIS-PM K.4(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume12-PartK-Chapter4.html)].

13. [^] 

 A full legal name includes the person’s first name, middle name(s) (if any), and family name (or surname) without any initials or nicknames. See 6 CFR 37.3; Real ID Act of 2005, Pub. L. 109-13, 49 U.S.C. 30301.

14. [^] 

 See 8 CFR 320.3(b)(1)(ix)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-31686/0-0-0-31730.html#0-0-0-19943) and 8 CFR 322.3(b)(1)(xiii)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-31769/0-0-0-31819.html#0-0-0-19965). 

15. [^] 

 See Chapter 4, Replacement of Certificate of Citizenship or Naturalization [12 USCIS-PM K.4(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume12-PartK-Chapter4.html)].

16. [^] 

 See 8 CFR 341.4(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-32825/0-0-0-32874.html#0-0-0-20589). The requirement to surrender the PRC or ARC does not apply to applicants naturalizing under INA 322(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-10018.html). 

17. [^] 

 See 8 CFR 341.5(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-32825/0-0-0-32878.html#0-0-0-20591). See Part J, Oath of Allegiance, Chapter 3, Oath of Allegiance Modifications and Waivers [12 USCIS-PM J.3(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume12-PartJ-Chapter3.html)].

18. [^] 

 See 8 CFR 103.7(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-11630/0-0-0-11638.html#0-0-0-9349).

19. [^] 

 See the relevant Volume 12 part for the specific eligibility requirements pertaining to the particular citizenship or naturalization provision, to include Part D, General Naturalization Requirements [12 USCIS-PM D(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume12-PartD.html)], Part G, Spouses of U.S. Citizens [12 USCIS-PM G(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume12-PartG.html)]; and Part I, Military Members and their Families [12 USCIS-PM I(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume12-PartI.html)].

20. [^] 

 Applicants with Taiwan passports may indicate Taiwan as country of nationality on their Form N-400 (Taiwan passports show “Republic of China”). Such applicants’ Certificates of Naturalization are issued showing Taiwan as country of former nationality. USCIS does not issue certificates showing “Taiwan, PRC,” “Taiwan, China,” “Taiwan, Republic of China,” or “Taiwan, ROC.” People’s Republic of China (PRC) is the country name used for applicants with PRC passports.

21. [^] 

 See INA 338(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-10345.html). See 8 CFR 338(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-32639/0-0-0-32644.html#0-0-0-20521).

22. [^] 

 A full legal name includes the person’s first name, middle name(s) (if any), and family name (or surname) without any initials or nicknames. See 6 CFR 37.3; Real ID Act of 2005, Pub. L. 109-13, 49 U.S.C. 30301.

23. [^] 

 See 8 CFR 338.5(e)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-32639/0-0-0-32661.html#0-0-0-20551).

24. [^] 

 See INA 338(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-10345.html). See 8 CFR 338(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-32639/0-0-0-32644.html#0-0-0-20521).

25. [^] 

 See 8 CFR 338.3(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-32639/0-0-0-32654.html#0-0-0-20525). The requirement to surrender the PRC or ARC does not apply to applicants naturalizing under INA 329(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-10163.html) who qualify for naturalization without being permanent residents. 

26. [^] 

 See Part J, Oath of Allegiance, Chapter 3, Oath of Allegiance Modifications and Waivers [12 USCIS-PM J.3(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume12-PartJ-Chapter3.html)].

27. [^] 

 See 8 CFR 103.7(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-11630/0-0-0-11638.html#0-0-0-9349).

28. [^] 

 See 8 CFR 338.5(a)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-32639/0-0-0-32661.html#0-0-0-20543).

29. [^] 

 See INA 343(c)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-10395.html#0-0-0-8049).

30. [^] 

 A request to change the gender on a certificate may also affect the marital status already listed on the certificate. See Adjudicator’s Field Manual (AFM) Chapter 10.22, Document Issuance Involving Status and Identity for Transgender Individuals(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/AFM/HTML/AFM/0-0-0-1/Chapter10-22.html). If the gender change results in the individual now being in a valid same-sex marriage, then the certificate must reflect his or her marital status as “married.”

31. [^] 

 See 8 CFR 338.5(e)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-32639/0-0-0-32661.html#0-0-0-20551). The regulation at 8 CFR 338.5(e)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-32639/0-0-0-32661.html#0-0-0-20551) specifically provides that USCIS will not deem a request to change a DOB justified if the naturalization certificate contains the DOB provided by the applicant at the time of naturalization. 

32. [^] 

 See Chapter 2, Certificate of Citizenship, Section B, Contents of Certificate of Citizenship, Subsection 3, Changes to Names or Dates of Birth per Court Order [12 USCIS-PM K.2(B)(3)(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume12-PartK-Chapter2.html#S-B-3)].

33. [^] 

 See 8 CFR 338.5(a)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-32639/0-0-0-32661.html#0-0-0-20543), 8 CFR 338.5(c)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-32639/0-0-0-32661.html#0-0-0-20547), and 8 CFR 338.5(e)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-32639/0-0-0-32661.html#0-0-0-20551). For pre-1991 judicial naturalization cases, the regulations provide that USCIS can “authorize” the court to make a change on the certificate if it is the result of clerical error. However, USCIS plays a minimal role in these cases. See 8 CFR 338.5(b)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-32639/0-0-0-32661.html#0-0-0-20545) and 8 CFR 338.5(e)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-32639/0-0-0-32661.html#0-0-0-20551).

34. [^] 

 See Part L, Revocation of Naturalization, Chapter 3, Effects of Revocation of Naturalization [12 USCIS-PM L.3(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume12-PartL-Chapter3.html)]. A Certificate of Naturalization issued to a person who lawfully filed an Application for Naturalization and proceeded through the naturalization process to the Oath of Allegiance cannot be canceled under INA 342(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-10390.html). Officers should consult with local USCIS counsel in such cases.

35. [^] 

 See INA 342(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-10390.html). Under the same conditions, USCIS may also cancel any copy of a declaration of intention, or other certificate, document, or record issued by USCIS or legacy INS.

36. [^] 

 See 8 CFR 342.1(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-32897/0-0-0-32904.html#0-0-0-20619).

37. [^] 

 See INA 342(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-10390.html).

38. [^] 

 See INA 342(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-10390.html).

39. [^] 

 See Part L, Revocation of Naturalization, Chapter 3, Effects of Revocation of Naturalization [12 USCIS-PM L.3(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume12-PartL-Chapter3.html)].