USCIS Policy Manual

VOLUME 9: WAIVERS

PART 3: GENERAL WAIVER PROCESSES AND PROCEDURES

PART A: EXTREME HARDSHIP

PART B: WAIVERS FOR HEALTH-RELATED GROUNDS OF INADMISSIBILITY

Chapter 1: Purpose and Background

A. Purpose


USCIS balances public health interests against family unity and the needs of the applicant in adjudicating waivers of medical inadmissibility. For this reason, one of the terms and conditions imposed on all applicants with the grant of a waiver is to receive treatment so that the medical condition no longer poses a public health risk. 

B. Background


A medical examination is generally required for all immigrant visa and some nonimmigrant visa applicants, as well as for refugees, and adjustment of status applicants. The purpose of the medical examination is to determine if an applicant has a medical condition(s) that renders him or her inadmissible to the United States.


Generally, applicants establish their admissibility on medical grounds by submitting a Report of Medical Examination and Vaccination Record (Form I-693(http://www.uscis.gov/i-693)), or Medical Examination for Immigrant or Refugee Applicant (1991 TB Technical Instructions) (Form DS-2053) or Medical Examination for Immigrant or Refugee Applicant (2007 TB Technical Instructions) (Form DS-2054), and related worksheets.[1] As of October 1, 2013, panel physicians only use DS-2054.


Civil surgeons or panel physicians complete these documents after the medical examination of the applicant,[2] See INA 212 and INA 232. certifying the presence or absence of physical or mental conditions that may render the applicant inadmissible. Two types of certifications may indicate to USCIS that the applicant may be inadmissible: a “Class A” and a “Class B” condition. 


A Class A condition is conclusive evidence that an applicant is inadmissible on health-related grounds. A Class B condition, unlike a Class A condition, does not make an applicant inadmissible on health-related grounds but may lead the officer to conclude that the applicant is inadmissible on other grounds (such as public charge).[3] See Volume 8, Admissibility, Part B, Health-Related Grounds of Inadmissibility [8 USCIS-PM B] for more information on Class A and B conditions. 


Before 1957, no waiver was available to applicants inadmissible on health-related grounds. The Immigration Act of 1957 created the first waiver provision for those afflicted with tuberculosis who had close relatives in the United States.[4] See Pub. L. 85-316, 71 Stat. 639 (Sept. 11, 1957). In addition, the 1965 amendments to the INA authorized the waiver of inadmissibility and admission of certain applicants in this category who had close relatives in the United States.[5] See Pub. L. 89-236, 79 Stat. 911 (Oct. 3, 1965).  


The Immigration Act of 1990[6] See Pub. L. 101-649, 104 Stat. 4978 (Nov. 29, 1990). relaxed the requirements for a familial relationship before a medical waiver could be granted. In addition, over time, other provisions were added to the 1952 Immigration Act that allowed for other waivers of medical grounds depending on the immigration benefit sought.

C. Scope


If an applicant is inadmissible because of a medical condition,[7] Under INA 212(a)(1)(A), four categories of medical conditions may render an applicant inadmissible: (1) Communicable disease of public health significance (2) For immigrants, failure to show proof of required vaccinations(3) Physical or mental disorder with associated harmful behavior(4) Drug abuse or addictionSee Volume 8, Admissibility, Part B, Health-Related Grounds of Inadmissibility [8 USCIS-PM B] for more information.  he or she may have a waiver available. The availability of a waiver depends on the legal provisions governing the immigration benefit the applicant seeks. 


This Part C only addresses the processes used for the medical waiver available to persons seeking an immigrant visa or adjustment of status based on a family- or employment-based petition.[8] Under INA 212(g). All medical grounds of inadmissibility have a corresponding waiver under this section except for inadmissibility based on drug abuse or addiction.[9] See INA 212(g), which specifically waives INA 212(a)(1)(A)(i)-INA 212(a)(1)(A)(iii) but omits reference to INA 212(a)(1)(A)(iv). 


Applicants for other immigration benefits categories, such as refugees and asylees seeking adjustment,[10] Under INA 209. Legalization or SAW applicants,[11] Under INA 245A and INA 210. or applicants under other special programs, may have additional or other means to waive grounds of medical inadmissibility, including inadmissibility for drug abuse or addiction.[12] For example, an asylee or a refugee seeking adjustment of status who is found to be a drug abuser or addict may apply for a waiver of inadmissibility under INA 209(c). INA 209(c) waivers are not addressed in this Part.,[13] While these other waivers may be briefly discussed in this chapter, more detailed discussion can be found in the program-specific waiver chapters in this volume.


Many of the processes mentioned in this Part C are also applicable to other medical waivers, such as those obtained by asylees or refugees seeking adjustment of status.


D. Legal Authorities

    • INA 212(a)(1)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2301) – Health-Related Grounds 

    • INA 212(g)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2813) – Bond and Conditions for Admission of Alien Excludable on Health-Related Grounds

    • 8 CFR 212.7(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-15905/0-0-0-16484.html#0-0-0-9201) – Waiver of Certain Grounds of Inadmissibility


E. Forms Used When Applying For a Medical Waiver


Applicants for the immigration benefits listed below may apply for a medical waiver by using the following USCIS forms:[14] For further information on waivers other than the medical waiver described in this Part, please see the program-specific waiver chapters in this volume. 


Applying for Waiver of Health-Related Ground of Inadmissibility

Immigration Benefits Category

Statutory Authority for Waiver

Relevant Form

Adjustment of status or immigrant visa 

INA 212(g)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2813)

Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility (Form I-601(http://www.uscis.gov/i-601)) (with the appropriate fee unless waived)

Admission as refugee under INA 207(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1625.html)

INA 207(c)(3)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1625.html#0-0-0-1909)

Application by Refugee for Waiver of Grounds of Excludability (Form I-602(http://www.uscis.gov/i-602)) (no fee associated) 

Refugee or asylee applying for adjustment of status under INA 209(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1825.html)

INA 209(c)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1825.html#0-0-0-2121)

Legalization under INA 245A(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-7668/0-0-0-7794.html) 

INA 245A(d)(2)(B)(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-7668/0-0-0-7794.html#0-0-0-6081)

Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility Under Sections 245A or 210 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (Form I-690(http://www.uscis.gov/i-690)) (with the appropriate fee unless waived)

Special Agricultural Workers (SAW) under INA 210(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1866.html)

INA 210(c)(2)(B)(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1866.html#0-0-0-2239)

T and U nonimmigrant visa 

INA 212(d)(13)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2791) and INA 212(d)(14)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2797)

Application for Advance Permission to Enter as Nonimmigrant (Form I-192(http://www.uscis.gov/i-192)) (with the appropriate fee unless waived)

Other nonimmigrant visa 

INA 212(d)(3)(A)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2731)


F. Role of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


Any waiver application to overcome a medical ground of inadmissibility (other than lack of a required vaccination) must be sent to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for review before USCIS can determine whether to grant or deny the waiver.

 

CDC’s favorable response does not constitute a waiver approval. The purpose of CDC’s review is to ensure that 


  • The civil surgeon or panel physician examined, diagnosed, and classified the applicant according to the Technical Instructions; and

  • The applicant (or person assuming the responsibility on behalf of the applicant) has identified a suitable health care provider in the United States who will provide medical care and treatment for the medical condition if a waiver is granted.


CDC’s response, however, carries significant weight in determining what terms, conditions, or controls should be placed on the waiver, and whether USCIS should approve the waiver.


Chapter 2: Waiver of Communicable Disease of Public Health Significance 


A. General


The INA authorizes USCIS to exercise discretion in deciding whether to waive inadmissibility based on a communicable disease of public health significance.[15] See INA 212(g)(1) and INA 212(a)(1)(A)(i). INA 212(g)(1) was also amended to include a specific provision for battered immigrants. See section 1505(d) of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (VTVPA), Pub. L. 106-386, 114 Stat. 1464 (October 28, 2000). For more information on the inadmissibility determination based on communicable disease of public health significance, see Volume 8, Admissibility, Part B, Health-Related Grounds of Inadmissibility, Chapter 6, Communicable Diseases of Public Health Significance [8 USCIS-PM B.6]. USCIS may grant this waiver in accordance with such terms, conditions,[16] A condition of granting a waiver for an applicant with a communicable disease of public health significance, such as tuberculosis, is that the applicant must agree to see a doctor immediately upon admission and make arrangements to receive private or public medical care for that disease. This requirement is reflected, for example, in the Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility (Form I-601), TB Supplement. and controls, if any, that USCIS considers appropriate after consultation with the Secretary of HHS.[17] See INA 212(g)(1)(B). This includes the grant of a waiver based on requiring payment of a bond. 


Once the officer has verified that the applicant is inadmissible because of a communicable disease of public health significance and requires a waiver,[18] Note that an applicant who has been determined to have a Class A condition involving a communicable disease of public health significance may successfully complete treatment. If, after treatment, the civil surgeon or panel physician certifies that the applicant now has a Class B condition, the applicant is no longer inadmissible and does not need a waiver.  the officer must go through the following steps to adjudicate the waiver application:


  • Determine whether the applicant meets the eligibility requirements of the waiver;


  • Consult with CDC; and


  • Determine whether the waiver is warranted as a matter of discretion. 


B. Special Note on HIV


As of January 4, 2010, HIV infection is no longer defined as a communicable disease of public health significance according to HHS regulations.[19] See 42 CFR 34.2(b) as amended by 74 FR 56547 (November 2, 2009). Therefore, HIV infection does not make an applicant inadmissible if the immigration benefit is adjudicated on or after January 4, 2010, even if the applicant filed the immigration benefit application before January 4, 2010. Officers should administratively close any HIV waiver application that is filed before January 4, 2010 but adjudicated on or after January 4, 2010.


C. Waiver Eligibility and Adjudication 


1. Qualifying Relationship


To be eligible for the waiver, the applicant must be one of the following:



The officer should verify that the existence of the appropriate relationship is well supported in the applicant’s file. 


2. Documentation for CDC’s Review 


As stated above, USCIS can only grant this waiver after it has consulted with CDC. However, CDC’s review of necessary documents does not constitute a waiver approval. CDC may recommend that USCIS should make the waiver subject to appropriate terms, conditions, or controls. 


To obtain CDC’s review of a waiver application, the officer should forward the following documents to CDC: 



Officers should only send copies, not originals, because CDC will retain the documents.

3. Sending Documents to CDC 


The documents should be mailed to the following address: 


Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Division of Global Migration and Quarantine

1600 Clifton Road, Mailstop E 03

Atlanta, GA 30333

Attention: Quality Assessment Program (QAP)/Waivers

 

If the officer determines that a waiver case warrants expeditious review by CDC, the case may be faxed to (404) 639-4441 or emailed to cdcqap@cdc.gov(mailto:cdcqap@cdc.gov), Attention: Quality Assessment Program (QAP)/Waivers, Urgent. If sent via email, the documents should be sent in password protected file(s). If sent via fax, the fax cover sheet should request that the case be reviewed expeditiously and that CDC’s response be sent via fax. The officer should also email CDC at cdcqap@cdc.gov(mailto:cdcqap@cdc.gov), advising that an expedited request was sent via fax. 


4. CDC Response


Once CDC receives and reviews the documents, CDC will forward a response letter with results of the review to the requesting USCIS office. CDC will not return any of the documents provided by USCIS; CDC will only send its recommendation in the response to the requesting USCIS office. 


CDC’s usual processing time for review and response to the requesting USCIS office is approximately 4 weeks. If CDC’s response appears delayed, the officer may contact CDC at cdcqap@cdc.gov(mailto:cdcqap@cdc.gov) to obtain a status update.


Upon receipt, the officer should review CDC’s response letter to determine next steps.


If CDC’s response letter indicates that CDC was satisfied with the initial documentation and that it does not require additional information, then the officer may proceed to the next step of the waiver adjudication. If CDC was not satisfied with the documentation, it may request additional information or recommend additional conditions to be met before the waiver may be granted. In such a case, the officer should issue a Request for Evidence (RFE) for the applicant to provide the additional information or to demonstrate that he or she made the arrangements required by CDC. 


If CDC requests it, the officer will need to submit the information obtained through the RFE to CDC to determine whether the additional information is sufficient. CDC will provide a response letter to the requesting USCIS office advising if the additional information is sufficient.


Once CDC indicates no additional information is needed, the officer may proceed with the next step of the waiver adjudication.


Note: For Class A TB waivers, CDC’s response letter will provide a specific recommendation whether CDC supports the granting of a waiver. 


5. Discretion 


As is generally the case for waivers, a waiver for communicable diseases of public health significance requires an officer to consider whether the grant of the waiver is warranted as a matter of discretion. Hardship to a qualifying relative is not required for this waiver.[26] See INA 212(g)(1).


CDC’s response in support of granting the waiver should ordinarily be sufficient to warrant a favorable exercise of discretion for the grant of the waiver. However, if an applicant declares openly his or her unwillingness to commit to treatment, the waiver may be denied as a matter of discretion.[27] If CDC certifies that an applicant who obtained an INA 212(g) waiver has failed to comply with any terms, conditions, or controls on the waiver, the applicant is subject to removal per INA 237(a)(1)(C)(ii). The U.S. health care provider treating the particular condition should provide a summary of the applicant’s initial evaluation to CDC or notify CDC that the applicant has failed to report for care. Generally, no further follow-up is required by the officer. If CDC does not issue a favorable recommendation, the officer generally should not grant the waiver as a matter of discretion.


By statute, it is USCIS’s decision whether to make the waiver subject to terms, conditions, or controls. A CDC recommendation concerning terms, conditions, or controls on the granting of the waiver ordinarily carries great persuasive weight. 


Once a final decision (approval or denial) is made on the waiver, the officer should inform CDC of the decision. The officer should provide a brief statement indicating the final action and date of the action and forward it to CDC by any of the following methods:


Mail: 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Division of Global Migration and Quarantine

1600 Clifton Road, Mailstop E 03

Atlanta, GA 30333

Attention: Quality Assessment Program (QAP)/Waivers


Fax: (404) 639-4441


Email: cdcqap@cdc.gov(mailto:cdcqap@cdc.gov) 


D. Step-by-Step Checklist


Step-by-Step Checklist

Step 1

Check for qualifying relationship to determine whether the applicant is eligible for the waiver.

Step 2

Gather the necessary documentation for CDC review.

Step 3

Send documentation to CDC.

Step 4

Review CDC response.

Step 5

Analyze whether the waiver should be granted as a matter of discretion.

Step 6

Inform CDC of waiver decision.


Chapter 3: Waiver of Immigrant Vaccination Requirement 


A. General


An applicant seeking an immigrant visa at U.S. Consulate or an applicant seeking adjustment of status in the United States who is found inadmissible for not being vaccinated[28] See INA 212(a)(1)(A)(ii). may be eligible for the following waivers:


  • The applicant has, by the date of the decision on the visa or adjustment application, received vaccination against the vaccine-preventable disease(s) for which he or she had previously failed to present documentation;[29] See INA 212(g)(2)(A).



  • The requirement of such a vaccination would be contrary to the applicant’s religious beliefs or moral convictions.[31] See INA 212(g)(2)(C). 


Each of these waivers has its own requirements.[32] These waivers are described in more detail in Section C, Blanket Waiver for Missing Vaccination Documentation [9 USCIS-PM C.3(C)]; Section D, Blanket Waiver if Vaccine is Not Medically Appropriate [9 USCIS-PM C.3(D)]; and Section E, Waiver due to Religious Belief or Moral Conviction [9 USCIS-PM C.3(E)]. Unlike some other waivers, no qualifying relative is required for the applicant to be eligible for a waiver of the immigrant vaccination requirement.


The first two waivers are often referred to as “blanket waivers.” USCIS grants blanket waivers if a health professional indicates that an applicant has received the required vaccinations or is unable to receive them for medical reasons. If USCIS grants blanket waivers, the applicant does not have to file a form or pay a fee. 


The waiver on account of religious or moral objection must be filed on the appropriate form and accompanied by the correct fee.

B. Use of Panel Physician’s or Civil Surgeon's Report 


The determination whether an applicant is inadmissible for lack of having complied with the vaccination requirement is made by reviewing the panel physician’s or civil surgeon’s vaccination assessment in the medical examination report.[33] See Volume 8, Admissibility, Part B, Health-Related Grounds of Inadmissibility [8 USCIS-PM B] for more information on the admissibility determination.


C. Blanket Waiver for Missing Vaccination Documentation[34] See INA 212(g)(2)(A).


Applicants who received the vaccinations for which documents were missing when they initially applied for adjustment of status or for an immigrant visa may be given a blanket waiver. 


A streamlined procedure applies for this waiver; no form is needed. If a required vaccine is lacking, the officer should issue a Request for Evidence (RFE). The RFE should instruct the applicant to return to the civil surgeon for corrective action that demonstrates the applicant has received the required vaccine(s). 


If the RFE response demonstrates that the missing vaccine(s) was received, the officer will deem the waiver granted. No annotation is needed on either the medical exam form, or any related form or worksheet. 

D. Blanket Waiver if Vaccine is Not Medically Appropriate[35] See INA 212(g)(2)(B).

1. Situations Specified in the Law[36] See Volume 8, Admissibility, Part B, Health-Related Grounds of Inadmissibility, Chapter 9, Vaccination Requirement [8 USCIS-PM B.9].


If the civil surgeon or the panel physician certifies that a vaccine is not medically appropriate for one or more of the following reasons, the officer may grant a blanket waiver (without requesting a form and fee):


  • The vaccine is not age appropriate;

  • The vaccine is contraindicated;

  • There is an insufficient time interval to complete the vaccination series; or 

  • It is not the flu season, or the vaccine for the specific flu strain is no longer available.


Once the civil surgeon or panel physician annotates that the vaccine(s) is not medically appropriate, no further annotation is needed and the officer may proceed with granting the waiver. The civil surgeon’s or panel physician’s annotation on the vaccination assessment sufficiently documents that the requirements for the waiver have been met; the officer does not need to make any further annotation on the vaccination report.

2. Nationwide Vaccination Shortage[37] See Volume 8, Admissibility, Part B, Health-Related Grounds of Inadmissibility, Chapter 9, Vaccination Requirement [8 USCIS-PM B.9] for more information on blanket waivers based on a nationwide vaccination shortage.


USCIS will grant a blanket waiver in the case of a vaccination shortage only if CDC recommends that USCIS should do so, and USCIS has published the appropriate guidance on its website. CDC will only make such a recommendation to USCIS after verifying that there is indeed a nationwide vaccination shortage and issuing the appropriate statement on its website for civil surgeons. In turn, USCIS will issue the appropriate statement on its website. 


The term “nationwide vaccine shortage” does not apply to the medical examination conducted by a panel physician overseas. If a vaccine is not available in the applicant’s country, the panel physician will annotate the vaccination assessment with the term “not routinely available.” If an officer encounters this annotation, the officer may grant a blanket waiver based on this annotation alone. 


E. Waiver due to Religious Belief or Moral Conviction[38] See INA 212(g)(2)(C).

1. General


USCIS may grant this waiver when the applicant establishes that compliance with the vaccination requirements would be contrary to his or her religious beliefs or moral convictions. Unlike other waivers of medical grounds of inadmissibility, there is no requirement that CDC review this waiver.


If, upon review of the medical documentation, the officer finds that the applicant is missing a vaccine and a blanket waiver is not available, the officer should ask the applicant why the vaccine is missing. The officer may request clarification during an interview or by sending an RFE. 


If the applicant indicates that he or she does not oppose vaccinations based on religious beliefs or moral convictions, the applicant may be inadmissible if he or she refuses to obtain the missing vaccine(s). The officer should issue an RFE if the applicant is willing to obtain the vaccine.


If the applicant indicates that he or she opposes vaccinations, the officer should inform the applicant of the possibility of the waiver. The officer should explain the basic waiver requirements for a religious belief or moral conviction waiver, as outlined below. The officer should, at that time, issue an RFE[39] An officer should only issue one RFE, requesting all the necessary information, including the request for the waiver application. for the waiver application. 


Upon receipt of the waiver documentation, the officer should proceed with the adjudication of the waiver.

2. Requirements


With the adjudication of this waiver, USCIS has always taken particular caution to avoid any perceived infringement on personal beliefs and First Amendment rights to free speech and religion. To best protect the public health, USCIS, in consultation with CDC, has established the following three requirements that an applicant (or, if the applicant is a child, the applicant’s parents) has to demonstrate through documentary evidence: 


The applicant must be opposed to all vaccinations in any form.[40] The requirement that the religious or moral objection must apply to all vaccines has been in effect since 1997. The former INS created this policy in light of principles developed regarding conscientious objection to the military draft and challenges to State-mandated vaccinations for public school students. 


The applicant has to demonstrate that he or she opposes vaccinations in all forms; the applicant cannot “pick and choose” between the vaccinations. The fact that the applicant has received certain vaccinations but not others is not automatic grounds for the denial of a waiver. Instead, the officer should consider the reasons provided for having received those vaccines. 


For example, the applicant's religious beliefs or moral convictions may have changed substantially since the date the particular vaccinations were administered, or the applicant is a child who may have already received certain vaccinations under the routine practices of an orphanage. These examples do not limit the officer’s authority to consider all credible circumstances and accompanying evidence. 


The objection must be based on religious beliefs or moral convictions.


This second requirement should be handled with sensitivity. On one hand, the applicant's religious beliefs must be balanced against the benefit to society as a whole. On the other hand, the officer should be mindful that vaccinations offend certain persons' religious beliefs. 


The religious belief or moral conviction must be sincere.


To protect only those beliefs that are held as a matter of conscience, the applicant must demonstrate that he or she holds the belief sincerely, and in subjective good faith of an adherent. Even if these beliefs accurately reflect the applicant's ultimate conclusions about vaccinations, they must stem from religious or moral convictions, and must not have been framed in terms of a particular belief so as to gain the legal remedy desired, such as this waiver. 


While an applicant may attribute his or her opposition to a particular religious belief or moral conviction that is inherently opposed to vaccinations, the focus of the waiver adjudication should be on whether that claimed belief or moral conviction is truly held, that is, whether it is applied consistently in the applicant’s life. 


The applicant does not need to be a member of a recognized religion or attend a specific house of worship. Note that the plain language of the statute refers to religious beliefs or moral convictions, not religious or moral establishments. 


It is necessary to distinguish between strong religious beliefs or moral convictions and mere preference. Religious beliefs or moral convictions are generally defined by their ability to cause an adherent to categorically disregard self-interest in favor of religious or moral tenets. The applicant has the burden of establishing a strong objection to vaccinations that is based on religious beliefs or moral convictions, as opposed to a mere preference against vaccinations. 

3. Evidence 


The applicant’s objection to the vaccination requirement on account of religious belief or moral conviction may be established through the applicant’s sworn statement. In this statement, the applicant should state the exact nature of those religious beliefs or moral convictions and establish how such beliefs would be violated or compromised by complying with the vaccination requirements. 


Additional corroborating evidence supporting the background for the religious belief or moral conviction, if available and credible, should also be submitted by the applicant and considered by the officer. For example, regular participation in a congregation can be established by submitting affidavits from other members in the congregation, or evidence of regular volunteer work. 


The officer should consider all evidence submitted by the applicant.


4. Discretion


As is generally the case for waivers, a waiver of the vaccination requirement requires an officer to consider whether the grant of the waiver is warranted as a matter of discretion. 


A favorable exercise of discretion is generally warranted if the applicant establishes that he or she objects to the vaccination requirement on account of religious beliefs or moral convictions. 


F. Step-by-Step Checklist


A blanket waiver may be available to the applicant. The officer should check whether the applicant is eligible for a blanket waiver before proceeding to this checklist. 

Adjudication Vaccination Requirement Waiver

Based on Religious Beliefs or Moral Convictions

Step

If YES …

If NO …

Step 1: Review the evidence for any indication that the applicant opposes the vaccination requirement based on religious beliefs or moral convictions.

Explain (during the interview or through an RFE) the waiver requirements and request that the applicant file a waiver, if he or she has not already done so. Proceed to Step 3.

RFE or interview to ascertain reasons why vaccines were not given. Proceed to Step 2A.

Step 2A: Did the applicant oppose the vaccines?

Explain to the applicant (at interview or through RFE) the waiver requirements and request that the applicant file a waiver if not already done so. Proceed to Step 3.

Proceed to Step 2B.

Step 2B: Is the applicant willing to obtain the missing vaccine?

Issue an RFE for corrective action of the vaccination assessment. Upon receipt of response to RFE, determine whether the vaccine requirement has been met. If the applicant is still missing vaccines, and no blanket waiver is available, begin at Step 1 again. 

Applicant is inadmissible based on INA 212(a)(1)(A)(ii)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2309) (irrespective of the grant of any blanket waivers).

Step 3: Review the waiver application to determine whether the applicant opposes the vaccination requirement in any form.

Proceed to Step 4.

The waiver should be denied and the applicant is inadmissible based on INA 212(a)(1)(A)(ii)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2309) (irrespective of the grant of any blanket waivers).

Step 4: Review the waiver application to determine whether the applicant opposes the vaccination requirement on account of religious belief or moral conviction.

Proceed to Step 5. 

The waiver should be denied and the applicant is inadmissible based on INA 212(a)(1)(A)(ii)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2309) (irrespective of the grant of any blanket waivers).

Step 5: Analyze whether the waiver application reflects that the applicant’s belief is sincere. 

Proceed to Step 6.

The waiver should be denied and the applicant is inadmissible based on INA 212(a)(1)(A)(ii)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2309) (irrespective of the grant of any blanket waivers).

Step 6: Analyze whether the waiver should be granted as a matter of discretion; ordinarily, the finding that the applicant holds sincere religious or moral objections should be sufficient for a grant of the waiver.

Grant the waiver.

The waiver should be denied and the applicant is inadmissible based on INA 212(a)(1)(A)(ii)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2309) (irrespective of the grant of any blanket waivers). 


Chapter 4: Waiver of Physical or Mental Disorder Accompanied by Harmful Behavior[41] See INA 212(g)(3).

A. General


If the applicant has a physical or mental disorder and behavior associated with the disorder that poses, may pose, or has posed a threat to the property, safety, or welfare of the applicant or others, the applicant must file a waiver to overcome this ground of inadmissibility.[42] See INA 212(a)(1)(A)(iii). See Volume 8, Admissibility, Part B, Health-Related Grounds of Inadmissibility [8 USCIS-PM B] for more information on the inadmissibility determination based on physical or mental disorders with associated harmful behavior.


The officer should remember that the physical or mental disorder alone (that is, without associated harmful behavior) or harmful behavior alone (without it being associated with a mental or physical disorder) is not sufficient to find the applicant inadmissible on health-related grounds.


USCIS may grant this discretionary waiver in accordance with such terms, conditions, and controls (if any) that USCIS imposes after consulting with the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS).[43] See INA 212(g)(3). A condition could include the payment of a bond. 


A common condition of granting a waiver for an applicant with a physical or mental disorder with associated harmful behavior is that the applicant must agree to see a U.S. health care provider immediately upon admission and make arrangements to receive care and treatment.


The officer must determine whether the applicant is eligible for the waiver, consult with CDC, and determine whether the waiver is warranted as a matter of discretion. 


B. Waiver Eligibility and Adjudication 

1. Qualifying Relationship


Unlike waivers for communicable diseases of public health significance, waivers for physical or mental disorders with associated harmful behaviors do not require a qualifying relationship.

 

2. Documentation for CDC’s Review 


As noted above, USCIS can only grant this waiver after it has consulted with CDC. However, CDC’s review of the necessary documents does not constitute a waiver approval. CDC may recommend that USCIS should make the waiver subject to appropriate terms, conditions, or controls. 


To obtain CDC’s review of the waiver application, the officer should forward the following documents to CDC: 



Officers should only send copies, not originals, because CDC retains the documents. 

3. Sending Documents to CDC 


The documents should be mailed to the following address: 


Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Division of Global Migration and Quarantine

1600 Clifton Road, Mailstop E 03

Atlanta, GA 30333

Attention: Quality Assessment Program (QAP)/Waivers

 

If the officer determines that a waiver case warrants expeditious review by CDC, the case may be faxed to (404) 639-4441 or emailed to cdcqap@cdc.gov(mailto:cdcqap@cdc.gov), Attention: Quality Assessment Program (QAP)/Waivers, Urgent. If sent via email, the documents should be sent in password protected file(s). If sent via fax, the fax cover sheet should request that the case be reviewed expeditiously and that CDC’s response be sent via fax. The officer should also email CDC at cdcqap@cdc.gov(mailto:cdcqap@cdc.gov), advising that an expedited request was sent via fax.

4. CDC Response


Once the documents are received by CDC, the documents are reviewed by CDC’s consultant psychiatrist and results of that review are forwarded to the requesting USCIS office. CDC will not return any of the documents provided by USCIS.


CDC’s usual processing time for review and response to the requesting USCIS office is approximately 4 weeks. If CDC’s response appears delayed, the officer may contact CDC at cdcqap@cdc.gov(mailto:cdcqap@cdc.gov) to obtain a status update.


Upon receipt, the officer should review CDC’s response to determine next steps. 


If CDC agrees in its response that the applicant has a Class A condition, CDC will send to the USCIS requesting office CDC 4.422-1 forms, Statements in Support of Application for Waiver of Inadmissibility Under Section 212(a)(1)(A)(iii)(I) or 212(a)(1)(A)(iii)(II) of the Immigration and Nationality Act. The officer must provide the CDC 4.422-1 forms[47] The CDC 4.422-1 forms are used to identify an appropriate U.S. health care provider for the waiver applicant. The forms are generated for the specific waiver applicant by CDC. Part II must be completed by U.S. health care provider and Part III must be completed by the applicant and/or the applicant’s sponsor. to the applicant (or the applicant’s sponsor) for completion. Once the CDC forms are completed and returned to USCIS, the officer must return the completed forms to CDC for review and endorsement. 

Once CDC receives the completed forms, it reviews them to determine whether the applicant has identified an appropriate U.S. health care provider and that the health care provider has completed the forms. If the appropriate U.S. health care provider has been identified, CDC will endorse the forms and return them to the requesting USCIS office. 

If CDC’s response indicates that the applicant is “Class B” or “no Class A or B,” it is CDC’s recommendation that the applicant does not require a waiver for the medical condition.


If CDC’s response indicates that additional information is needed in order to complete the review, the officer should issue a Request for Evidence (RFE) for the applicant to provide additional information as specified by CDC. The officer should submit the information obtained through the RFE to CDC. CDC will provide a response to USCIS regarding the additional information. Once CDC indicates that no additional information is needed, the officer may proceed with the adjudication of the waiver.

5. Discretion


As is generally the case for waivers, a waiver for mental or physical conditions with associated harmful behavior requires an officer to consider whether the grant of the waiver is warranted as a matter of discretion.[48] Neither a qualifying relationship nor a finding of hardship is required.  


CDC’s review and endorsement of the identified U.S. health care provider should ordinarily be sufficient to warrant a favorable exercise of discretion for the grant of the waiver. However, if an applicant declares openly his or her unwillingness to commit to treatment, the waiver may be denied as a matter of discretion.[49] If CDC certifies that a person who obtained an INA 212(g) waiver has failed to comply with any terms, conditions, or controls on the waiver, the person is subject to removal per INA 237(a)(1)(C)(ii). The U.S. health care provider treating the particular condition should provide a summary of the applicant’s initial evaluation to CDC as provided on CDC 4.422-1 form. Generally, no further follow-up is required by the officer.  If CDC does not favorably endorse the identified U.S. health care provider, the officer should generally not grant the waiver as a matter of discretion.


By statute, it is USCIS’s decision whether to make the waiver subject to terms, conditions or controls. A CDC recommendation concerning terms, conditions, or controls on the granting of the waiver ordinarily has great persuasive weight, but is not binding on USCIS. 


USCIS should inform CDC of the decision (approval or denial) of the waiver. The officer does so by completing the CDC response letter that CDC provided when it returned the endorsed CDC forms to the officer. 

 

C. Step-by-Step Checklist


Step-by-Step Checklist

Step 1

Gather the necessary documentation for CDC review.

Step 2

Send documentation to CDC.

Step 3

Review CDC response.

Step 4

If applicable, have CDC 4.422.1 forms completed by the applicant and return them for endorsement by CDC.

Step 5

Analyze whether the waiver should be granted as a matter of discretion.


Chapter 5: Waiver of Drug Abuse and Addiction

A. Adjustment of Status and Immigrant Visa Applicants


In general, no waiver is available for adjustment of status and immigrant visa applicants who are found inadmissible because of drug abuse or drug addiction.[50] There are specific statutory provisions that permit USCIS to waive this ground, such as those applying to asylees and refugees seeking adjustment, and Legalization and SAW applicants. These waivers are specific to those classes of immigrants and are outside the scope of this chapter, which focuses only on waivers available under INA 212(g). See Volume 8, Admissibility, Part B, Health-Related Grounds of Inadmissibility [8 USCIS-PM B] for more information on inadmissibility on account of drug abuse or drug addiction.  


B. Remission


Although a waiver is unavailable for medical inadmissibility due to drug abuse or addiction, an applicant may still overcome this inadmissibility if his or her drug abuse or addiction is found to be in remission. After being found inadmissible due to drug abuse or drug addiction, an applicant may undergo a re-examination at a later date at his or her own cost. If, upon re-examination, the civil surgeon or panel physician certifies, per the applicable HHS regulations and CDC’s Technical Instructions, that the applicant is in remission, the applicant is no longer inadmissible as a drug abuser or addict. 


PART C: CRIMINAL AND RELATED GROUNDS OF INADMISSIBILITY

PART D: ALIENS SUBJECT TO CIVIL PENALTY

PART E: ALIEN SMUGGLING

PART F: WAIVERS FOR FRAUD AND WILLFUL MISREPRESENTATION

Chapter 1: Purpose and Background 


A. Purpose


An applicant who is inadmissible for fraud or willful misrepresentation may be eligible for a waiver.[51] See INA 212(a)(6)(C)(i). A waiver of inadmissibility allows an applicant to enter the United States or obtain an immigration benefit despite having been found inadmissible. 


The purpose of a waiver for inadmissibility due to fraud or willful misrepresentation[52] See INA 212(a)(6)(C)(i). is to:


  • Provide humanitarian relief and promote family unity;


  • Ensure the applicant merits favorable discretion based on positive factors outweighing the applicant’s fraud or willful misrepresentation and any other negative factors; and


  • Allow the applicant to overcome the inadmissibility or removability ground.


B. Background


Prior to September 30, 1996, a waiver was available to applicants who could show either: 


  • More than 10 years had passed since the date of the fraud or willful misrepresentation; or

 

  • The applicant’s U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident (LPR) parents, spouse, or children would suffer extreme hardship if the applicant was refused admission to the United States. 


The Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 (IIRIRA)[53] See Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act, section 349, Pub. L. 104-208 (September 30, 1996). limited the availability of the waiver and eliminated the possibility of applying for a waiver if more than 10 years have passed.[54] Under INA 212(i). The applicable law for the adjudication of an INA 212(i) waiver is the law in effect on the date of the decision on the waiver application. See Matter of Cervantes-Gonzalez, 22 I&N Dec. 560, 563 (BIA 1999). A waiver is now available only to applicants who can demonstrate extreme hardship to:


  • A U.S. citizen parent or spouse; 


  • An LPR parent or spouse;



  • In the case of a Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) self-petitioner: the VAWA self-petitioner, or his or her U.S. citizen, LPR, or qualified alien parent or child.


IIRIRA made other changes that play a role in the waiver adjudication. IIRIRA modified the inadmissibility provision[56] See INA 212(a)(6)(C). by creating two inadmissibility grounds within the same provision: 



The waiver[59] Under INA 212(i). discussed in this Part G only applies to applicants who are inadmissible for fraud or willful misrepresentation.[60] See INA 212(a)(6)(C)(i). 


Inadmissibility based on a false claim to U.S. citizenship made on or after September 30, 1996[61] IIRIRA made September 30, 1996 the effective date of the new INA 212(a)(6)(C)(ii). See Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act, section 344(c), Pub. L. 104-208 (September 30, 1996). cannot be waived through a waiver for fraud or willful misrepresentation.[62] See INA 212(i). Some separate adjustment mechanisms, such as INA 209 (for refugees and asylees) may have more broadly available waivers that could apply to an applicant who is inadmissible under INA 212(a)(6)(C)(ii). For example, INA 209(c) allows the waiver of many grounds of inadmissibility, and does not list INA 212(a)(6)(C)(ii) as a ground that cannot be waived. However, because IIRIRA’s changes were not retroactive, applicants who falsely claimed U.S. citizenship before September 30, 1996, are considered inadmissible for fraud or willful misrepresentation and may still seek the fraud or willful misrepresentation waiver.


C. Scope


The availability of a waiver of inadmissibility based on fraud or willful misrepresentation depends on the immigration benefit for which an applicant is seeking. The guidance in this Policy Manual part only addresses the processes used for the fraud or willful misrepresentation waiver[63] This guidance only addresses the waiver under INA 212(i). The fraud or willful misrepresentation waiver discussed in this guidance is also available to applicants who obtained, or attempted to obtain, a benefit based on falsely claiming U.S. citizenship before September 30, 1996.  available to applicants listed in the table below.


Classes of Applicants Eligible to Apply for Waiver under INA 212(i)

Applicants seeking:

  • An immigrant visa or adjustment of status based on a family-based petition or as a VAWA self-petitioner

  • An immigrant visa or adjustment of status based on an employment-based petition    

  • A nonimmigrant K visa (fiancé(e)s of U.S. citizens and their accompanying minor children, foreign spouses, and step-children of U.S. citizens)

  • A nonimmigrant V visa (spouses and unmarried children under age 21, or step-children of lawful permanent residents)



Applicants seeking other immigration benefits may have different means to waive inadmissibility for fraud or willful misrepresentation. 


D. Legal Authorities



E. Applicants Who May Have a Waiver Available


The chart below details who may apply for a waiver of inadmissibility based on fraud or willful misrepresentation and the relevant form. This chart includes waivers under INA 212(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2424.html#0-0-0-2855) as well as waivers of inadmissibility for fraud or willful misrepresentation under other provisions of the INA. 



Available Waiver of Inadmissibility Based on

Fraud or Willful Misrepresentation

Applicant Category


Relevant Form

Applicants for adjustment of status, immigrant visas, and K and V nonimmigrant visas seeking waiver under INA 212(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2424.html#0-0-0-2855)

Form I-601(http://www.uscis.gov/i-601)

Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility

Temporary Protected Status (TPS) applicants seeking waiver under INA 244(c)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-7238.html#0-0-0-5687)

Form I-601(http://www.uscis.gov/i-601)

Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility

Applicants for admission as refugees under INA 207(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1625.html)

Form I-602(http://www.uscis.gov/i-602)

Application by Refugee for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility

Refugees and asylees applying for adjustment of status under INA 209(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1825.html)[65] If the officer has sufficient information in the file to determine whether the ground can be waived, then no form is required. 

Form I-602(http://www.uscis.gov/i-602)

Application by Refugee for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility

Legalization applicants under INA 245A(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-7668/0-0-0-7794.html) 

Form I-690(http://www.uscis.gov/i-690)

Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility

Special Agricultural Workers (SAW) under INA 210(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1866.html)

Form I-690(http://www.uscis.gov/i-690)

Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility

Nonimmigrants, including T and U[66] T nonimmigrant status is for victims of human trafficking. U nonimmigrant status is for victims of certain criminal activity. visa applicants (but not K and V nonimmigrants)

Form I-192(http://www.uscis.gov/i-192)

Application for Advance Permission to Enter as Nonimmigrant


1.  Immigrants, Adjustment of Status Applicants, and K and V Visa Applicants


USCIS has the discretion to waive inadmissibility based on fraud or willful misrepresentation[67] Under INA 212(i). for:


  • A VAWA self-petitioner seeking adjustment of status;


  • An immigrant visa applicant who is the spouse, son, or daughter of a U.S. citizen or LPR;


  • An adjustment of status applicant who is the spouse, son, or daughter of a U.S. citizen or LPR;


  • A V visa applicant who is the spouse, son, or daughter of a U.S. citizen or LPR; 




The instructions to Form I-601(http://www.uscis.gov/i-601) and the USCIS website detail when and where the applicant should file the waiver.[70] For information on the adjudication of these waivers, see Chapter 2, Adjudication of Fraud and Willful Misrepresentation Waivers [9 USCIS-PM G.2]. 


2. Refugees


An applicant seeking admission as a refugee and who is inadmissible for fraud or willful misrepresentation may seek a waiver.[71] These applicants seek a waiver under INA 207. The waiver may be approved if the grant serves humanitarian purposes, family unity, or other public interests. The waiver is processed overseas as part of the refugee package.


3. Asylee and Refugee Based Adjustment Applicants 


At the time of adjustment, asylees and refugees seeking adjustment of status may apply for a waiver of inadmissibility for fraud or willful misrepresentation.[72] These applicants seek a waiver under INA 209. The waiver can be approved if the grant serves humanitarian purposes, family unity, or other public interests. Under current USCIS policy, the officer has the discretion to grant the waiver with or without a waiver application for certain grounds of inadmissibility.


Waiver applications for refugees are usually adjudicated overseas before the applicant is admitted in the refugee classification. However, if the refugee is inadmissible based on actions that occurred prior to or after admission, the refugee can apply for a waiver when seeking adjustment.


4. Legalization and SAW Applicants 


Legalization applicants[73] See INA 245A and any legalization-related class settlement agreements. and Special Agricultural Workers (SAW) applicants[74] See INA 210. may be granted a waiver of inadmissibility based on fraud or willful misrepresentation if the grant serves humanitarian purposes, family unity, or other public interests.[75] For more information on waivers for legalization applicants see INA 245A(d)(2)(B)(i). See 8 CFR 245a.2(k), and 8 CFR 245a.18. For more information on waivers for SAW applicants see INA 210(c)(2)(B)(i). 


5. Nonimmigrants, including T and U Nonimmigrant Visa Applicants 


An applicant seeking admission as a nonimmigrant and who is inadmissible for fraud or willful misrepresentation may obtain a waiver for advance permission to enter the United States.[76] These applicants seek relief under INA 212(d)(3). This waiver is granted at the discretion of the Secretary of Homeland Security. 


If the applicant is seeking a nonimmigrant visa (other than K, T, U, and V) overseas, the applicant must apply for the waiver through a U.S. Consulate. The Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Admissibility Review Office (ARO) adjudicates the waiver.[77] See INA 212(d)(3)(A)(i). If the applicant is not required to have a visa (other than visa waiver applicants) and is applying for the waiver at the U.S. border, the application is filed with CBP.[78] See Customs and Border Protection website for more information. 


If the applicant is applying for a T or U nonimmigrant visa, the applicant must always file the waiver application with USCIS. 


If the applicant is applying for a K or V nonimmigrant visa, the applicant is generally treated as if he or she is an intending immigrant. Therefore, the applicant must file a waiver application with USCIS if inadmissible for fraud or willful misrepresentation.[79] See INA 212(i). If USCIS grants the waiver, DOS will grant a nonimmigrant waiver[80] See INA 212(d)(3). without CBP involvement.


Chapter 2: Adjudication of Fraud and Willful Misrepresentation Waivers[81] See INA 212(i). 


A. Eligibility


An applicant inadmissible for fraud or willful misrepresentation may be eligible for a waiver. Before adjudicating the waiver, the officer should determine if the applicant is inadmissible for fraud or willful misrepresentation.[82] For more on inadmissibility for fraud and willful misrepresentation, see Volume 8, Admissibility, Part J, Fraud and Willful Misrepresentation [8 USCIS-PM J].


If inadmissible, the applicant must meet the following requirements before a waiver can be granted:


  • The applicant must show that denial of admission to or removal from the United States would result in extreme hardship to his or her qualifying relative (or if the applicant is a VAWA self-petitioner, to himself or herself); and 


General Guidelines for Adjudication of 

Fraud and Willful Misrepresentation Waivers

Step 1

Determine whether the applicant is a VAWA self-petitioner or has established the relationship to the qualifying relative.

Step 2

Determine whether the applicant has demonstrated that his or her qualifying relative (or the applicant himself or herself, if a VAWA self-petitioner) would suffer extreme hardship if the applicant were denied admission to or removed from the United States as a result of the denial of the waiver. 

Step 3

Determine whether the waiver should be granted as a matter of discretion, particularly whether positive equities such as humanitarian relief to a qualifying relative and family unity overcome negative factors such as fraud and willful misrepresentation.


B. Waiver Adjudication


1. Determine Whether the Applicant Has a Qualifying Relative


For cases other than VAWA self-petitioners, the applicant must have a qualifying relative who is either the applicant’s:


  • U.S. citizen parent or spouse;

  • Lawful permanent resident (LPR) parent or spouse; or

  • U.S. citizen fiancé(e) petitioner (for K-1 or K-2 visa applicants only).


U.S. citizen or LPR children are not qualifying relatives. 


A VAWA self-petitioner does not need a qualifying relative, since the VAWA self-petitioner may claim extreme hardship to himself or herself. The VAWA self-petitioner may also claim extreme hardship to a U.S. citizen, LPR, or qualified alien parent or child.[84]See INA 212(i), INA 204(a)(1)(A)(iii), and INA 204(a)(1)(A)(iv). 


The evidence needed to establish that an applicant has a qualifying relative is generally the same as the evidence required to establish the underlying relationship for a relative or fiancé(e) visa petition.


2. Make an Extreme Hardship Determination


An applicant must demonstrate that his or her qualifying relative (or the applicant himself or herself, if a VAWA self-petitioner) would suffer extreme hardship if the applicant were refused admission to or removed from the United States as a result of the denial of the waiver. 


If the applicant fails to establish extreme hardship, then the officer must deny the waiver application because the applicant has not met the statutory requirements of the waiver. Before denying the waiver, the officer should follow standard operating procedures regarding issuance of a Request for Evidence or Notice of Intent to Deny. 


In general, a finding that the applicant has not shown extreme hardship is sufficient to support a denial of the waiver application. If the applicant has not established extreme hardship, then it is unnecessary to determine whether the waiver would have been granted as a matter of discretion. There may be instances, however, where the applicant’s past actions were so egregious that the officer may want to note in the decision that even if extreme hardship were found, the application would be denied as a matter of discretion. 


If the applicant has established extreme hardship, the officer should proceed with the discretionary determination. 


3. Analyze Whether the Waiver Should Be Granted as a Matter of Discretion


A fraud or willful misrepresentation waiver generally requires an officer to consider whether granting the waiver is warranted as a matter of discretion. The officer should determine whether the applicant’s positive factors outweigh the negative factors. 

 

The finding of extreme hardship experienced by a qualifying relative (or the VAWA self-petitioner himself or herself) is the first positive factor for consideration. The underlying fraud or willful misrepresentation itself is the first negative factor to consider.[85] See INS v. Yueh-Shaio Yang, 519 U.S. 26 (1996). See Matter of Cervantes-Gonzalez, 22 I&N Dec. 560 (BIA 1999).  The nature, seriousness, and underlying circumstances of the fraud or willful misrepresentation may influence the weight given to this negative factor. Considerations include, but are not limited to: 


  • The facts and circumstances surrounding the fraud or willful misrepresentation;


  • The reasons and motivations of the applicant when the fraud or willful misrepresentation was committed;


  • Age or mental capacity of the applicant when the fraud was committed;



Chapter 3: Effect of Granting a Waiver


A. Validity of an Approved Waiver


If the waiver[88] See INA 212(i). is granted, then, except for K-1 and K-2 nonimmigrants and conditional permanent residents,[89] For K-1 and K-2 nonimmigrants granted a waiver, see Section B, Conditional Grant of a Waiver to K-1 or K-2 Nonimmigrant Visa Applicants [9 USCIS-PM G.3(B)]. the grant permanently waives fraud or willful misrepresentation included in the application for purposes of any future immigration benefits application, whether immigrant or nonimmigrant. The waiver remains valid even if the person later abandons or otherwise loses lawful permanent resident (LPR) status.[90] See 8 CFR 212.7(a)(4)(ii).


For conditional permanent residents,[91] Foreign nationals lawfully admitted for permanent residence on a conditional basis. See INA 216. the waiver only becomes valid indefinitely if and when the conditions are removed from his or her permanent resident status. Conversely, termination of the conditional permanent resident status also terminates the validity of the waiver.[92] See 8 CFR 212.7(a)(4)(iv). 


A waiver applies only to the specific grounds of inadmissibility and related crimes, events or incidents specified in the waiver application.[93] See 8 CFR 212.7(a)(4)(i). If, in the future, the applicant is found inadmissible for a separate incident of fraud or willful misrepresentation not already included in an approved waiver application, he or she will be required to file another waiver application. USCIS may reconsider an approval of a waiver at any time if it is determined that the decision has been made in error.[94] See 8 CFR 212.7(a)(4)(v).

B. Conditional Grant of a Waiver to K-1 or K-2 Nonimmigrant Visa Applicants


If the applicant seeks a waiver to obtain a fiancé(e) visa (K-1 or K-2), the waiver’s approval is conditioned upon the K-1 nonimmigrant marrying the U.S. citizen who filed the fiancé(e) petition.[95] See 8 CFR 212.7(a)(4)(iii).  The waiver becomes permanent once the K-1 marries the petitioner, as discussed in the section on validity of an approved waiver.[96] See Section A, Validity of an Approved Waiver [9 USCIS-PM G.3(A)].


If the K-1 nonimmigrant does not marry the petitioner, the K-1 and K-2 (if applicable) will remain inadmissible for purposes of any application for a benefit on any basis other than the proposed marriage between the K-1 and the K nonimmigrant visa petitioner.[97] See 8 CFR 212.7(a)(4)(iii).


C.   Inadmissibility Based on Documentary Requirements[98] See INA 212(a)(7). 


If an applicant procured an immigration benefit by fraud or willful misrepresentation, the applicant may also be inadmissible for lack of documentary requirements at the time of entry. When an applicant is granted a waiver for fraud or willful misrepresentation, inadmissibility based on lack of documentary requirements at the time of entry is also implicitly waived. 


Example


An applicant misrepresents a material fact during the overseas nonimmigrant visa application process. The Department of State, however, grants the applicant a visa. Later, the applicant applies for adjustment of status. During the adjustment interview, an officer discovers the misrepresentation and finds applicant inadmissible for both willful misrepresentation[99] See INA 212(a)(6)(C)(i). and failure to comply with documentary requirements.[100] See INA 212(a)(7)(B)(i) (for example, for not possessing a valid nonimmigrant visa). The applicant then applies for a waiver of inadmissibility for willful misrepresentation.[101] See INA 212(i). Approval of the waiver has the effect of waiving inadmissibility for willful misrepresentation and for the lack of a valid visa at the time of entry.



PART G: UNLAWFUL PRESENCE

PART H: PROVISIONAL UNLAWFUL PRESENCE

PART I: NATIONAL INTEREST

PART J: FAMILY UNITY, HUMANITARIAN PURPOSES, OR PUBLIC INTEREST

PART K: NONIMMIGRANT

PART L: OTHER PROVISIONS OVERCOMING INADMISSIBILITY

PART M: MOTIONS AND APPEALS




Footnotes


1. [^] 

 As of October 1, 2013, panel physicians only use DS-2054.

2. [^] 

 See INA 212(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html) and INA 232(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-5339.html).

3. [^] 

 See Volume 8, Admissibility, Part B, Health-Related Grounds of Inadmissibility [8 USCIS-PM B(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume8-PartB.html)] for more information on Class A and B conditions.

4. [^] 

 See Pub. L. 85-316, 71 Stat. 639 (Sept. 11, 1957).

5. [^] 

 See Pub. L. 89-236, 79 Stat. 911 (Oct. 3, 1965).

6. [^] 

 See Pub. L. 101-649, 104 Stat. 4978 (Nov. 29, 1990).

7. [^] 

 Under INA 212(a)(1)(A)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2303), four categories of medical conditions may render an applicant inadmissible: 

(1) Communicable disease of public health significance 

(2) For immigrants, failure to show proof of required vaccinations

(3) Physical or mental disorder with associated harmful behavior

(4) Drug abuse or addiction

See Volume 8, AdmissibilityPart B, Health-Related Grounds of Inadmissibility [8 USCIS-PM B(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume8-PartB.html)] for more information. 

8. [^] 

 Under INA 212(g)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2813).

9. [^] 

 See INA 212(g)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2813), which specifically waives INA 212(a)(1)(A)(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2305)-INA 212(a)(1)(A)(iii)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2311) but omits reference to INA 212(a)(1)(A)(iv)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2317).

10. [^] 

 Under INA 209(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1825.html).

11. [^] 

 Under INA 245A(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-7668/0-0-0-7794.html) and INA 210(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1866.html).

12. [^] 

 For example, an asylee or a refugee seeking adjustment of status who is found to be a drug abuser or addict may apply for a waiver of inadmissibility under INA 209(c)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1825.html#0-0-0-2121). INA 209(c)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1825.html#0-0-0-2121) waivers are not addressed in this Part.

13. [^] 

 While these other waivers may be briefly discussed in this chapter, more detailed discussion can be found in the program-specific waiver chapters in this volume.

14. [^] 

 For further information on waivers other than the medical waiver described in this Part, please see the program-specific waiver chapters in this volume.

15. [^] 

 See INA 212(g)(1)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2817) and INA 212(a)(1)(A)(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2305). INA 212(g)(1)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2817) was also amended to include a specific provision for battered immigrants. See section 1505(d) of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (VTVPA), Pub. L. 106-386, 114 Stat. 1464 (October 28, 2000). For more information on the inadmissibility determination based on communicable disease of public health significance, see Volume 8, Admissibility, Part B, Health-Related Grounds of Inadmissibility, Chapter 6, Communicable Diseases of Public Health Significance [8 USCIS-PM B.6(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume8-PartB-Chapter6.html)].

16. [^] 

 A condition of granting a waiver for an applicant with a communicable disease of public health significance, such as tuberculosis, is that the applicant must agree to see a doctor immediately upon admission and make arrangements to receive private or public medical care for that disease. This requirement is reflected, for example, in the Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility (Form I-601(http://www.uscis.gov/i-601)), TB Supplement.

17. [^] 

 See INA 212(g)(1)(B)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2817).

18. [^] 

 Note that an applicant who has been determined to have a Class A condition involving a communicable disease of public health significance may successfully complete treatment. If, after treatment, the civil surgeon or panel physician certifies that the applicant now has a Class B condition, the applicant is no longer inadmissible and does not need a waiver

19. [^] 

 See 42 CFR 34.2(b)(http://www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-44228.html) as amended by 74 FR 56547 (November 2, 2009).

20. [^] 

 USCIS interprets the references to “unmarried son or daughter” as embracing both those sons and daughters who qualify as “children” because they are not yet 21 years old and sons and daughters who are over 21, so long as they are not married. 

21. [^] 

 USCIS interprets “minor unmarried lawfully adopted child” as a clarifying, not as a restricting, provision. Therefore, an applicant is eligible to apply for this waiver if he or she qualifies as the “child” of a citizen or permanent resident (or a  person who has received an immigrant visa) under any provision of INA 101(b)(1)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-101/0-0-0-434.html#0-0-0-1131). This includes, but is not limited to, both children adopted abroad to be admitted in class IR3 or IH3 and children whose adoption will be finalized in the United States to be admitted in class IR4 or IH4. 

22. [^] 

 Under INA 204(a)(1)(A)(iii)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1272.html#0-0-0-1331) or INA 204(a)(1)(A)(iv)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1272.html#0-0-0-1711) or INA 204(a)(1)(B)(ii)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1272.html#0-0-0-1731) or INA 204(a)(1)(B)(iii)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1272.html#0-0-0-1735), including derivative children of the person. This includes self-petitioning spouses and children eligible for classification under INA 204(a)(1)(A)(v)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1272.html#0-0-0-1715) or INA 204(a)(1)(B)(iv)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1272.html#0-0-0-1745).

23. [^] 

 TB is currently the only communicable disease of public health significance that requires a supplement.

24. [^] 

 For instance, evidence of the family relationship.

25. [^] 

 Report of Medical Examination and Vaccination Record (Form I-693(http://www.uscis.gov/i-693)); Medical Examination for Immigrant or Refugee Applicant (1991 TB Technical Instructions) (Form DS-2053) or the Medical Examination for Immigrant or Refugee Applicant (2007 TB Technical Instructions) (Form DS-2054), and related worksheets.

26. [^] 

 See INA 212(g)(1)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2817).

27. [^] 

 If CDC certifies that an applicant who obtained an INA 212(g)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2813) waiver has failed to comply with any terms, conditions, or controls on the waiver, the applicant is subject to removal per INA 237(a)(1)(C)(ii)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-5684.html#0-0-0-4463). The U.S. health care provider treating the particular condition should provide a summary of the applicant’s initial evaluation to CDC or notify CDC that the applicant has failed to report for care. Generally, no further follow-up is required by the officer.

28. [^] 

 See INA 212(a)(1)(A)(ii)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2309).

29. [^] 

 See INA 212(g)(2)(A)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2825).

30. [^] 

 See INA 212(g)(2)(B)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2827).

31. [^] 

 See INA 212(g)(2)(C)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2829).

32. [^] 

 These waivers are described in more detail in Section C, Blanket Waiver for Missing Vaccination Documentation [9 USCIS-PM C.3(C)(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume9-PartC-Chapter3.html#S-C)]; Section D, Blanket Waiver if Vaccine is Not Medically Appropriate [9 USCIS-PM C.3(D)(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume9-PartC-Chapter3.html#S-D)]; and Section E, Waiver due to Religious Belief or Moral Conviction [9 USCIS-PM C.3(E)(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume9-PartC-Chapter3.html#S-E)].

33. [^] 

 See Volume 8, Admissibility, Part B, Health-Related Grounds of Inadmissibility [8 USCIS-PM B(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume8-PartB.html)] for more information on the admissibility determination.

34. [^] 

 See INA 212(g)(2)(A)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2825).

35. [^] 

 See INA 212(g)(2)(B)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2827).

36. [^] 

 See Volume 8, Admissibility, Part B, Health-Related Grounds of Inadmissibility, Chapter 9, Vaccination Requirement [8 USCIS-PM B.9(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume8-PartB-Chapter9.html)].

37. [^] 

 See Volume 8, Admissibility, Part B, Health-Related Grounds of Inadmissibility, Chapter 9, Vaccination Requirement [8 USCIS-PM B.9(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume8-PartB-Chapter9.html)] for more information on blanket waivers based on a nationwide vaccination shortage.

38. [^] 

 See INA 212(g)(2)(C)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2829).

39. [^] 

 An officer should only issue one RFE, requesting all the necessary information, including the request for the waiver application.

40. [^] 

 The requirement that the religious or moral objection must apply to all vaccines has been in effect since 1997. The former INS created this policy in light of principles developed regarding conscientious objection to the military draft and challenges to State-mandated vaccinations for public school students. 

41. [^] 

 See INA 212(g)(3)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2831).

42. [^] 

 See INA 212(a)(1)(A)(iii)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2311). See Volume 8, Admissibility, Part B, Health-Related Grounds of Inadmissibility [8 USCIS-PM B(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume8-PartB.html)] for more information on the inadmissibility determination based on physical or mental disorders with associated harmful behavior.

43. [^] 

 See INA 212(g)(3)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2831).

44. [^] 

 For instance, evidence of the family relationship.

45. [^] 

 Report of Medical Examination and Vaccination Record (Form I-693(http://www.uscis.gov/i-693)); Medical Examination for Immigrant or Refugee Applicant (1991 TB Technical Instructions) (Form DS-2053) or the Medical Examination for Immigrant or Refugee Applicant (2007 TB Technical Instructions) (Form DS-2054), and related worksheets.

46. [^] 

 The Instructions to Form I-601(http://www.uscis.gov/i-601) detail the contents that should be included in the doctor’s report.

47. [^] 

 The CDC 4.422-1 forms are used to identify an appropriate U.S. health care provider for the waiver applicant. The forms are generated for the specific waiver applicant by CDC. Part II must be completed by U.S. health care provider and Part III must be completed by the applicant and/or the applicant’s sponsor.

48. [^] 

 Neither a qualifying relationship nor a finding of hardship is required. 

49. [^] 

 If CDC certifies that a person who obtained an INA 212(g)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2813) waiver has failed to comply with any terms, conditions, or controls on the waiver, the person is subject to removal per INA 237(a)(1)(C)(ii)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-5684.html#0-0-0-4463). The U.S. health care provider treating the particular condition should provide a summary of the applicant’s initial evaluation to CDC as provided on CDC 4.422-1 form. Generally, no further follow-up is required by the officer. 

50. [^] 

 There are specific statutory provisions that permit USCIS to waive this ground, such as those applying to asylees and refugees seeking adjustment, and Legalization and SAW applicants. These waivers are specific to those classes of immigrants and are outside the scope of this chapter, which focuses only on waivers available under INA 212(g)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2813). See Volume 8, Admissibility, Part B, Health-Related Grounds of Inadmissibility [8 USCIS-PM B(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume8-PartB.html)] for more information on inadmissibility on account of drug abuse or drug addiction.

51. [^] 

 See INA 212(a)(6)(C)(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2155).

52. [^] 

 See INA 212(a)(6)(C)(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2155).

53. [^] 

 See Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act, section 349, Pub. L. 104-208 (September 30, 1996).

54. [^] 

 Under INA 212(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2424.html#0-0-0-2855). The applicable law for the adjudication of an INA 212(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2424.html#0-0-0-2855) waiver is the law in effect on the date of the decision on the waiver application. See Matter of Cervantes-Gonzalez, 22 I&N Dec. 560, 563 (BIA 1999).

55. [^] 

 A fiancé(e) is not yet the spouse of a U.S. citizen. However, K inadmissibility issues are generally addressed as if the fiancé(e) were seeking admission as an immigrant. See 22 CFR 41.81(d). See Matter of Sesay, 25 I&N Dec. 431 (BIA 2011). As discussed below, the grant of an INA 212(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2424.html#0-0-0-2855) waiver to a K nonimmigrant fiancé(e) or fiancé(e) child is conditioned on the fiancé(e)’s actually marrying the citizen petitioner. See 8 CFR 212.7(a)(4)(iii)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-15905/0-0-0-16484.html#0-0-0-12429).

56. [^] 

 See INA 212(a)(6)(C)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2545).

57. [^] 

 See INA 212(a)(6)(C)(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2155).

58. [^] 

 See INA 212(a)(6)(C)(ii)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2547), as implemented by the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act, section 344(a), Pub. L. 104-208 (September 30, 1996).

59. [^] 

 Under INA 212(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2424.html#0-0-0-2855).

60. [^] 

 See INA 212(a)(6)(C)(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2155).

61. [^] 

 IIRIRA made September 30, 1996 the effective date of the new INA 212(a)(6)(C)(ii)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2547). See Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act, section 344(c), Pub. L. 104-208 (September 30, 1996).

62. [^] 

 See INA 212(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2424.html#0-0-0-2855). Some separate adjustment mechanisms, such as INA 209(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1825.html) (for refugees and asylees) may have more broadly available waivers that could apply to an applicant who is inadmissible under INA 212(a)(6)(C)(ii)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2547). For example, INA 209(c)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1825.html#0-0-0-2121) allows the waiver of many grounds of inadmissibility, and does not list INA 212(a)(6)(C)(ii)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2547) as a ground that cannot be waived.

63. [^] 

 This guidance only addresses the waiver under INA 212(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2424.html#0-0-0-2855)The fraud or willful misrepresentation waiver discussed in this guidance is also available to applicants who obtained, or attempted to obtain, a benefit based on falsely claiming U.S. citizenship before September 30, 1996. 

64. [^] 

 This includes false claims to U.S. citizenship made before September 30, 1996.

65. [^] 

 If the officer has sufficient information in the file to determine whether the ground can be waived, then no form is required. 

66. [^] 

 T nonimmigrant status is for victims of human trafficking. U nonimmigrant status is for victims of certain criminal activity.

67. [^] 

 Under INA 212(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2424.html#0-0-0-2855).

68. [^] 

 A fiancé(e) is not yet the spouse of the U.S. citizen. K inadmissibility issues, however, are generally addressed as if the fiancé(e) were seeking admission as an immigrant. See 22 CFR 41.81(d). See Matter of Sesay, 25 I&N Dec. 431 (BIA 2011). As discussed below, the grant of an INA 212(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2424.html#0-0-0-2855) waiver to a K nonimmigrant fiancé(e) or fiancé(e) child is conditioned on the fiancé(e)’s actually marrying the citizen petitioner.

69. [^] 

 Foreign spouses or step-children of U.S. citizens.

70. [^] 

 For information on the adjudication of these waivers, see Chapter 2, Adjudication of Fraud and Willful Misrepresentation Waivers [9 USCIS-PM G.2(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume9-PartG-Chapter2.html)].

71. [^] 

 These applicants seek a waiver under INA 207(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1625.html).

72. [^] 

 These applicants seek a waiver under INA 209(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1825.html).

73. [^] 

 See INA 245A(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-7668/0-0-0-7794.html) and any legalization-related class settlement agreements.

74. [^] 

 See INA 210(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1866.html).

75. [^] 

 For more information on waivers for legalization applicants see INA 245A(d)(2)(B)(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-7668/0-0-0-7794.html#0-0-0-6081). See 8 CFR 245a.2(k)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-26097.html#0-0-0-8915a), and 8 CFR 245a.18(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-26097.html#0-0-0-8915a). For more information on waivers for SAW applicants see INA 210(c)(2)(B)(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1866.html#0-0-0-2239).

76. [^] 

 These applicants seek relief under INA 212(d)(3)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2729).

77. [^] 

 See INA 212(d)(3)(A)(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2735).

78. [^] 

 See Customs and Border Protection website(http://www.cbp.gov/) for more information. 

79. [^] 

 See INA 212(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2424.html#0-0-0-2855).

80. [^] 

 See INA 212(d)(3)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2364.html#0-0-0-2729).

81. [^] 

 See INA 212(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2424.html#0-0-0-2855).

82. [^] 

 For more on inadmissibility for fraud and willful misrepresentation, see Volume 8, Admissibility, Part J, Fraud and Willful Misrepresentation [8 USCIS-PM J(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume8-PartJ.html)].

83. [^] 

 Once found inadmissible, the underlying fraud or willful misrepresentation is not considered again until the officer determines whether the waiver is warranted as a matter of discretion. For more information, see Chapter 3, Effect of Granting a Waiver [9 USCIS-PM G.3(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume9-PartG-Chapter3.html)].

84. [^] 

See INA 212(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2424.html#0-0-0-2855), INA 204(a)(1)(A)(iii)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1272.html#0-0-0-1331), and INA 204(a)(1)(A)(iv)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-1272.html#0-0-0-1711).

85. [^] 

 See INS v. Yueh-Shaio Yang, 519 U.S. 26 (1996). See Matter of Cervantes-Gonzalez, 22 I&N Dec. 560 (BIA 1999). 

86. [^] 

 See INS v. Yueh-Shaio Yang, 519 U.S. 26 (1996).

87. [^] 

 In Matter of Tijam, 22 I&N Dec. 408, 413 (BIA 1998), the BIA stated that it considered making false statements under oath during the naturalization process to be an extremely serious adverse factor because of the Government’s interest in maintaining the integrity of that process.

88. [^] 

 See INA 212(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2424.html#0-0-0-2855).

89. [^] 

 For K-1 and K-2 nonimmigrants granted a waiver, see Section B, Conditional Grant of a Waiver to K-1 or K-2 Nonimmigrant Visa Applicants [9 USCIS-PM G.3(B)(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume9-PartG-Chapter3.html#S-B)].

90. [^] 

 See 8 CFR 212.7(a)(4)(ii)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-15905/0-0-0-16484.html#0-0-0-12429).

91. [^] 

 Foreign nationals lawfully admitted for permanent residence on a conditional basis. See INA 216(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-4223.html).

92. [^] 

 See 8 CFR 212.7(a)(4)(iv)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-15905/0-0-0-16484.html#0-0-0-12429).

93. [^] 

 See 8 CFR 212.7(a)(4)(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-15905/0-0-0-16484.html#0-0-0-12429).

94. [^] 

 See 8 CFR 212.7(a)(4)(v)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-15905/0-0-0-16484.html#0-0-0-12429).

95. [^] 

 See 8 CFR 212.7(a)(4)(iii)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-15905/0-0-0-16484.html#0-0-0-12429). 

96. [^] 

 See Section A, Validity of an Approved Waiver [9 USCIS-PM G.3(A)(http://www.uscis.gov/policymanual/HTML/PolicyManual-Volume9-PartG-Chapter3.html#S-A)].

97. [^] 

 See 8 CFR 212.7(a)(4)(iii)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-11261/0-0-0-15905/0-0-0-16484.html#0-0-0-12429).

98. [^] 

 See INA 212(a)(7)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2581).

99. [^] 

 See INA 212(a)(6)(C)(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2155).

100. [^] 

 See INA 212(a)(7)(B)(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006.html#0-0-0-2593) (for example, for not possessing a valid nonimmigrant visa).

101. [^] 

 See INA 212(i)(http://www.uscis.gov/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-2006/0-0-0-2424.html#0-0-0-2855).