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Celebrating Constitution Day and Citizenship Day with Naturalization Ceremonies

Constitution Day and Citizenship Day is celebrated each year on Sept. 17 in remembrance of the signing of the U.S. Constitution in 1787. USCIS marks this occasion – also known as Constitution Week – by holding special naturalization ceremonies across the country. 

This year, we will welcome more than 27,000 new citizens in more than 160 naturalization ceremonies between Sept. 17 and Sept. 23. A list of highlighted ceremonies is below.

We welcome you to share your ceremony experiences and photos via Twitter and other social media, using the hashtag #newUScitizen. You can also follow @USCIS  on Twitter and Facebook.com/USCIS.

 

DateCity, StateLocation

Sept. 17, 2014

New York, New York

Thurgood Marshall United States Courthouse

Sept. 17, 2014

Providence, Rhode Island

Roger Williams National Memorial

Sept. 17, 2014

Tumacacori-Carmen, Arizona

Tumacácori National Historical Park

Sept. 17, 2014

Independence, Missouri

Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum

Sept. 17, 2014

Sacramento, California

Sacramento Memorial Auditorium

Sept. 17, 2014

Quincy, Massachusetts

Adams National Historical Park

Sept. 17, 2014

San Diego, California

Golden Hall

Sept. 17, 2014

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

National Constitution Center

Sept. 17, 2014

Yosemite, California

Yosemite National Park Glacier Point

Sept. 17, 2014

Wilmington, North Carolina

Battleship North Carolina

Sept. 17, 2014

St. Louis, Missouri

Old Courthouse, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial

Sept. 17, 2014

Toledo, Ohio

University of Toledo Law School

Sept. 17, 2014

Washington, D.C.

National Archives and Records Administration

Sept. 17, 2014

Jamaica, New York

King Manor Museum

Sept. 17, 2014

San Antonio, Texas

The Alamo

Sept. 17, 2014

Portland, Maine

University of Southern Maine

Sept. 17, 2014

Las Vegas, Nevada

Historic Fifth Street School

Sept. 17, 2014

Honolulu, Hawaii

Battleship  Missouri Memorial

Sept. 17, 2014

Flat Rock, North Carolina

Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site

Sept. 17, 2014

Mount Holly, New Jersey

Burlington County’s Olde Historic Courthouse

Sept. 17, 2014

Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina

Charles Pinckney National Historic Site

Sept. 17, 2014

Staunton, Virginia

Frontier Culture Museum

Sept. 17, 2014

San Francisco, California

Angel Island

Sept. 17, 2014

Brockport, New York

The College at Brockport: State University of New York

Sept. 17, 2014

Louisville, Ohio

Louisville Middle School

Sept. 17, 2014

Morristown, New Jersey

Morristown National Historical Park

Sept. 17, 2014

Springfield, Massachusetts

Springfield Armory National Historic Site

Sept. 17, 2014

Cleveland, Ohio

Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland

Sept. 17, 2014

Shelburne, Vermont

Shelburne Museum

Sept. 17, 2014

Akron, Ohio

Akron-Summit County Public Library

Sept. 17, 2014

Littleton, Colorado

Littleton City Council Chambers

Sept. 18, 2014

Campbell, California

Campbell Heritage Theater

Sept. 18, 2014

Clarkston, Georgia

Georgia Piedmont Technical College

Sept. 18, 2014

San Diego, California

Marine Corps Recruit Depot

Sept. 18, 2014

Boston, Massachusetts

Faneuil Hall

Sept. 19, 2014

Vancouver, Washington

Fort Vancouver National Historic Site

Sept. 19, 2014

Lorton, Virginia

Gunston Hall

Sept. 19, 2014

Jersey City, New Jersey

Liberty State Park

Sept. 20, 2014

Vienna, Virginia

Oakton High School

Sept. 23, 2014

Oakland, California

The Paramount Theater

 

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USCIS ELIS Security Question Reset Fact Sheet

The Purpose of the Security Question Reset

USCIS ELIS is conducting this security question reset in response to stakeholder requests for simpler and more easy-to-remember security questions. Personal security questions help prevent unauthorized users from accessing your account. They also enable you to reset your password if you have forgotten it.

It is a standard industry practice to conduct a security question reset to maintain consistency across online accounts. Your personal information has NOT been compromised in any way. This security question reset allows USCIS to use the same security questions for all USCIS ELIS accounts. 

Security Questions and Your USCIS ELIS Account

There are two types of security questions—password reset questions and security preference questions.

Your password reset questions allow you to access your account when you have forgotten your password. When you first created your USCIS ELIS account, you created a password. You were also asked to choose five questions and provide answers to those questions in the event you forgot your password.

Your security preference questions allow USCIS ELIS to authenticate you each time you access your account. Once you created your password, you were asked to indicate how USCIS ELIS should authenticate you every time you log in. You could choose from three security preferences:

  • receiving a one-time PIN through your email account,
  • receiving an SMS text message on your mobile telephone, or
  • answering a series of personal identity questions chosen by you.

Resetting Your Security Questions

Updating your security questions is quick and easy. There is no deadline for resetting your security questions. The next time you log in to your USCIS ELIS account, you will be guided step-by-step through the process of choosing new questions and providing new answers.

Problems Logging In

If you are unable to log in to your USCIS ELIS account because you forgot your current password and cannot remember the answers to your security questions, please submit the online help form to receive assistance from the USCIS Customer Contact Center.

Once you have reset your password and log in to your USCIS ELIS account, you will be prompted to update your security questions.

Future Resets

At this time, USCIS has not planned another security question reset for USCIS ELIS. However, you can update your security questions any time you log in to your USCIS ELIS account.

Contact Us

If you have additional questions about your security questions or USCIS ELIS account, please fill out the Web form.

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H-1B Filing Tips and Religious Workers Engagement

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) invites you to participate in a stakeholder
teleconference with the California and Vermont Service Centers on Thursday, October 9, 2014,
from 11 a.m. -12:30 p.m. (Eastern).
Please note that this engagement was previously scheduled
for Thursday, September 25. There will be two 45-minute sessions during this teleconference. The
first session, from 11-11:45 a.m., will focus on H-1B filing tips. The second session, from 11:45 a.m. -
12:30 p.m., will focus on eligibility requirements for religious workers.


During this engagement, USCIS subject matter experts will be available to answer your questions.


To register for this teleconference, please follow the steps below:

1. Email CSC-CEO@uscis.dhs.gov and reference “H-1B Filing Tips and Religious Workers
    Engagement RSVP” in the subject line.
2. Include your full name and the organization you represent in the body of the email.
3. Once your registration is processed, you will receive a confirmation email with additional
     details.


NOTE: Please note that this engagement has been rescheduled from September 25 to October 9. If
you previously registered for the September 25 event, please RSVP again for the October 9
engagement.


To submit questions or agenda items before the teleconference, please:
• Email us at CSC-CEO@uscis.dhs.gov. Please submit all questions and agenda items by
Thursday, September 18 .


If you have any questions regarding the registration process, or if you do not receive a confirmation
email within two business days, please email us at CSC-CEO@uscis.dhs.gov.


We look forward to engaging with you!

Meeting Invitation

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Quarterly EB-5 Stakeholder Engagement

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) invited you to participate in a stakeholder teleconference on Wednesday, Sept. 10, from 2:30–4 p.m. (Eastern) to discuss the EB-5 Immigrant Investor Program.


During this teleconference, USCIS officials shared EB-5 Immigrant Investor Program updates and responded to questions.


Meeting Invitation

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USCIS Language Access Plan

Providing Limited English Proficient individuals with meaningful access to USCIS services

USCIS’ Language Access Plan establishes goals and guidelines to ensure that Limited English Proficient (LEP) individuals have meaningful access to our services and information. This draft plan summarizes our efforts to comply with Executive Order 13166 and the Department of Homeland Security’s Language Access Plan.

Executive Order 13166 directs each federal agency to “examine the services it provides and develop and implement a system by which LEP individuals can meaningfully access those services consistent with, and without unduly burdening the fundamental mission of the Agency.”

The Department of Homeland Security’s Language Access Plan requires each DHS component to draft its own plan.

USCIS regularly interacts with customers in languages other than English through translated materials, multilingual public engagements, the National Customer Service Center toll-free line and in-person appointments at our offices. As part of our commitment, we also routinely produce educational and outreach materials in multiple languages and publish them to the Multilingual Resource Center. The agency also conducts assessments of language access efforts.

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H-1B Specialty Occupations, DOD Cooperative Research and Development Project Workers, and Fashion Models

This visa category applies to people who wish to perform services in a specialty occupation, services of exceptional merit and ability relating to a Department of Defense (DOD) cooperative research and development project, or services as a fashion model of distinguished merit or ability.

Eligibility Criteria

Visa Category

General Requirements

Labor Condition Application Required?

H-1B Specialty Occupations

The job must meet one of the following criteria to qualify as a specialty occupation:

  • Bachelor’s or higher degree or its equivalent is normally the minimum entry requirement for the position
  • The degree requirement for the job is common to the industry or the job is so complex or unique that it can be performed only by an individual with a degree
  • The employer normally requires a degree or its equivalent for the position
  • The nature of the specific duties is so specialized and complex that the knowledge required to perform the duties is usually associated with the attainment of a bachelor’s or higher degree.*

For you to qualify to accept a job offer in a specialty occupation you must meet one of the following criteria:

  • Have completed a U.S. bachelor’s or higher degree required by the specific specialty occupation from an accredited college or university
  • Hold a foreign degree that is the equivalent to a U.S. bachelor’s or higher degree in the specialty occupation
  • Hold an unrestricted state license, registration, or certification which authorizes you to fully practice the specialty occupation and be engaged in that specialty in the state of intended employment
  • Have education, training, or progressively responsible experience in the specialty that is equivalent to the completion of such a degree, and have recognition of expertise in the specialty through progressively responsible positions directly related to the specialty.**

Yes. The prospective employer must file an approved Form ETA-9035, Labor Condition Application (LCA), with the Form I-129, Petition for a Nonimmigrant Worker. See the links to the Department of Labor’s (DOL) Office of Foreign Labor Certification and USCIS forms to the right.

For more information see the “Information for Employers & Employees” link to the left.

 

 

H-1B2

DOD Researcher and Development Project Worker

The job must meet both of the following criteria to qualify as a DOD cooperative research and development project:

  • The cooperative research and development project or a co-production project is provided for under a government-to-government agreement administered by the U.S. Department of Defense
  • A bachelor’s or higher degree, or its equivalent is required to perform duties.

To be eligible for this visa category you must meet one of the following criteria:

  • Have completed a U.S. bachelor’s or higher degree required by the specific specialty occupation from an accredited college or university
  • Hold a foreign degree that is the equivalent to a U.S. bachelor’s or higher degree in the specialty occupation
  • Hold an unrestricted State license, registration, or certification which authorizes you to fully practice the specialty occupation and be engaged in that specialty in the state of intended employment
  • Have education, training, or progressively responsible experience in the specialty that is equivalent to the completion of such a degree, and have recognition of expertise in the specialty through progressively responsible positions directly related to the specialty.**

No.

H-1B3

Fashion Model

 

 

The position/services must require a fashion model of prominence.

To be eligible for this visa category you must be a fashion model of distinguished merit and ability.

Yes. The prospective employer must file an approved LCA with the Form I-129. See the links to the Department of Labor’s Office of Foreign Labor Certification and USCIS forms to the right.

*For more information, see 8 CFR §214.2(h)(4)(iii)(A).
**For more information see 8 CFR §214.2(h)(4)(iii)(C).

Application Process

Step 1: (only required for specialty occupation and fashion model petitions): Employer Submits LCA to DOL for certification.
The employer must apply for and receive DOL certification of an LCA. For further information regarding LCA requirements and DOL's inert process, see the "Foreign Labor Certification, Department of Labor" link to the right.
Step 2: Employer Submits Completed Form I-129 to USCIS.
The employer should file Form I-129, Petition for a Nonimmigrant Worker, with the correct USCIS Service Center. Please see our I-129 Direct Filing Chart page. The DOL-certified LCA must be submitted with the Form I-129 (only for specialty occupation and fashion models). See the instructions to the Form I-129 for additional filing requirements.
Step 3: Prospective Workers Outside the United States Apply for Visa and/or Admission.
Once the Form I-129 petition has been approved, the prospective H-1B worker who is outside the United States may apply with the U.S. Department of State (DOS) at a U.S. embassy or consulate abroad for an H-1B visa (if a visa is required). Regardless of whether a visa is required, the prospective H-1B worker must then apply to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) for admission to the United States in H-1B classification.

Labor Condition Application (LCA)

Prospective specialty occupation and distinguished fashion model employers must obtain a certification of an LCA from the DOL. This application includes certain attestations, a violation of which can result in fines, bars on sponsoring nonimmigrant or immigrant petitions, and other sanctions to the employer. The application requires the employer to attest that it will comply with the following labor requirements:

  • The employer will pay the beneficiary a wage which is no less than the wage paid to similarly qualified workers or, if greater, the prevailing wage for your position in the geographic area in which you will be working.
  • The employer will provide working conditions that will not adversely affect other similarly employed workers. At the time of the labor condition application there is no strike or lockout at the employer place of business. Notice of the filing of the labor condition application with the DOL has been given to the union bargaining representative or has been posted at the place of business.

Period of Stay

As an H-1B nonimmigrant, you may be admitted for a period of up to three years. Your time period may be extended, but generally cannot go beyond a total of six years, though some exceptions do apply under sections 104(c) and 106(a) of the American Competitiveness in the Twenty-First Century Act (AC21).

Your employer will be liable for the reasonable costs of your return transportation if your employer terminates you before the end of your period of authorized stay. Your employer is not responsible for the costs of your return transportation if you voluntarily resign your position. You must contact the Service Center that approved your petition in writing if you believe that your employer has not complied with this requirement.

H-1B Cap

The H-1B visa has an annual numerical limit "cap" of 65,000 visas each fiscal year. The first 20,000 petitions filed on behalf of beneficiaries with a U.S. master’s degree or higher are exempt from the cap. Additionally, H-1B workers who are petitioned for or employed at an institution of higher education or its affiliated or related nonprofit entities or a nonprofit research organization, or a government research organization are not subject to this numerical cap.

For further information about the numerical cap, see our Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 H-1B Cap Season Web page.

Family of H-1B Visa Holders

Your spouse and unmarried children under 21 years of age may seek admission in the H-4 nonimmigrant classification. Family members in the H-4 nonimmigrant classification may not engage in employment in the United States.

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DHS Announces 18-Month Re-designation and 18-Month Extension of Temporary Protected Status for South Sudan

Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson will re-designate South Sudan for Temporary Protected Status (TPS) and extend the existing TPS designation for the country from Nov. 3, 2014, through May 2, 2016. This allows eligible nationals of South Sudan (or persons without nationality who last habitually resided in South Sudan) to register or re-register for TPS in accordance with the notice published today in the Federal Register.

Current South Sudanese beneficiaries seeking to extend their TPS status must re-register during a 60-day period that runs from Sept. 2, 2014, through Nov. 3, 2014. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) encourages beneficiaries to re-register as soon as possible once the 60-day period begins. USCIS will not accept applications before Sept. 2, 2014.

Who’s EligibleCurrent TPS StatusWhen to File
Current TPS beneficiaries from South SudanHave TPSTo extend your TPS, you must re-register during a 60-day re-registration period that runs fromSept. 2, 2014, through Nov. 3, 2014.

South Sudan nationals and persons without nationality who last habitually resided in South Sudan, who have:

  • Continuously resided in the United States since Sept. 2, 2014, and
  • Been continuously physically present in the United States since November 3, 2014
Do Not Have TPSTo obtain TPS, you may apply for TPS during a 180-day initial registration period that runs from Sept. 2, 2014, through  March 2, 2015.

 During the past year, the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of State reviewed the conditions in South Sudan. Based upon this review, Secretary Johnson determined that a re-designation and 18-month extension of TPS for South Sudan is warranted due to the significant deterioration of conditions in that country and the inability of its nationals to return in safety. The extension and re-designation of South Sudan for TPS are based on ongoing armed conflict in that country and the continuation of extraordinary and temporary conditions that led to the country’s most recent TPS designation in 2013.

South Sudanese nationals, or persons having no nationality who last habitually resided in South Sudan, may be eligible for TPS under the re-designation if they continuously resided in the United States since Sept. 2, 2014, and have been continuously physically present in the United States since November 3, 2014. In addition, applicants must meet all other TPS eligibility and filing requirements.

The 18-month extension allows TPS re-registrants to apply for a new Employment Authorization Document (EAD). Eligible South Sudan TPS beneficiaries who re-register during the 60-day period and request a new EAD will receive one with an expiration date of May 2, 2016. USCIS recognizes that some re-registrants may not receive their new EADs until after their current EADs expire. Therefore, USCIS is automatically extending current TPS South Sudan EADs bearing a Nov. 2, 2014, expiration date for an additional six months. These existing EADs are now valid through May 2, 2015.

DHS anticipates that there are approximately 20 individuals who will be eligible to re-register for TPS under the existing designation of South Sudan and estimates that between 300 to 500 additional individuals might be eligible for TPS under the re-designation.

Individuals applying for TPS for the first time must submit:

Individuals re-registering for TPS must submit:

  • Form I-821, Application for Temporary Protected Status;
  • Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization, regardless of whether they want an EAD;
  • The Form I-765 application fee, but only if they want an EAD (All individuals re-registering for TPS who want an EAD must pay the I-765 fee, regardless of their age); and
  • The biometric services fee if they are age 14 or older.

Individuals who still have a pending initial TPS application under South Sudan do not need to submit a new Form I-821. However, if such individuals currently have a TPS-related EAD and want a new EAD, they should submit:

  • Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization;
  • The Form I-765 application fee, regardless of their age; and
  • A copy of the receipt notice for the initial Form I-821 that is still pending.

Applicants may request that USCIS waive any or all fees based on inability to pay by filing Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver, or by submitting a written request. Fee-waiver requests must be accompanied by supporting documentation. USCIS will reject the TPS application of any applicant who fails to submit the required filing fees or a properly documented fee-waiver request.

All USCIS forms are free. Applicants can download these forms from the USCIS website at www.uscis.gov/forms or request forms by calling USCIS toll-free at 1-800-870-3676.

Additional information about TPS for South Sudan—including guidance on eligibility, the application process and where to file—is available online at www.uscis.gov/tps. The Federal Register notice published today  contains further details about this extension and re-designation of South Sudan for TPS, including application requirements and procedures, and the six month auto-extension of current TPS South Sudan EADs.
 
Applicants seeking information about the status of their individual cases can check My Case Status Online or call the USCIS National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833).

For more information on USCIS and its programs, please visit www.uscis.gov or follow USCIS on Facebook (/uscis), Twitter (@uscis), YouTube (/uscis) and the USCIS blog The Beacon.

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DHS Announces 18-Month Extension of Temporary Protected Status for Sudan

Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson will extend Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for eligible nationals of Sudan for an additional 18 months, effective Nov. 3, 2014, through May 2, 2016.

Current Sudanese beneficiaries seeking to extend their TPS status must re-register during a 60-day period that runs from Sept. 2, 2014, through Nov. 3, 2014. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) encourages beneficiaries to re-register as soon as possible once the 60-day period begins. USCIS will not accept applications before Sept. 2, 2014.

The extension of TPS for Sudan is based on ongoing armed conflict in that region and the continuation of extraordinary and temporary conditions that led to the country’s most recent TPS designation in 2013. Secretary Johnson determined that extending the designation is warranted based on Department of Homeland Security and Department of State reviews of country conditions conducted during the past year.

The 18-month extension also allows TPS re-registrants to apply for a new Employment Authorization Document (EAD). Eligible Sudan TPS beneficiaries who re-register during the 60-day period and request a new EAD will receive one with an expiration date of May 2, 2016. USCIS recognizes that some re-registrants may not receive their new EADs until after their current EADs expire. Therefore, USCIS is automatically extending current TPS Sudan EADs bearing a Nov. 2, 2014, expiration date for an additional six months. These existing EADs are now valid through May 2, 2015.

DHS anticipates that there are approximately 600 individuals who will be eligible to re-register for TPS under the existing designation of Sudan.

Individuals re-registering for TPS must submit:

Individuals who still have a pending initial TPS application under TPS Sudan do not need to submit a new Form I-821. However, if such individuals currently have a TPS-related EAD and want a new EAD, they should submit:

  • Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization;
  • The Form I-765 application fee, regardless of their age; and
  • A copy of the receipt notice for the initial Form I-821 that is still pending.

Applicants may request that USCIS waive any or all fees based on inability to pay by filing Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver, or by submitting a written request. Fee-waiver requests must be accompanied by supporting documentation. USCIS will reject the TPS application of any applicant who fails to submit the required filing fees or a properly documented fee-waiver request.

All USCIS forms are free. Applicants can download these forms from the USCIS website at www.uscis.gov/forms or request forms by calling USCIS toll-free at 1-800-870-3676.

Additional information about TPS for Sudan—including guidance on eligibility, the application process and where to file—is available online at www.uscis.gov/tps. The Federal Register notice published today  contains further details about this extension of TPS for Sudan, including application requirements and procedures and the six month auto-extension of current TPS Sudan EADs.
 
Applicants seeking information about the status of their individual cases can check My Case Status Online or call the USCIS National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833).

For more information on USCIS and its programs, please visit www.uscis.gov or follow USCIS on Facebook (/uscis), Twitter (@uscis), YouTube (/uscis) and the USCIS blog The Beacon.

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Temporary I-551 Stamps and MRIVs

A machine-readable immigrant visa (MRIV) usually has the following text on it: “UPON ENDORSEMENT SERVES AS TEMPORARY I-551 EVIDENCING PERMANENT RESIDENCE FOR 1 YEAR.” When a new immigrant first enters the United States, Customs and Border Protection (CBP) will stamp the passport with an admission stamp that shows permanent resident status and the date the new immigrant entered the United States. The employee’s foreign passport with the MRIV is evidence of permanent residence status for one year from the date of admission. Even if the MRIV is issued without the statement “FOR 1 YEAR,” employers should still treat the MRIV as an acceptable List A document valid for one year from the date of admission.

Here is an example of an immigrant visa with the CBP endorsement:

Image: CBP endorsed Immigrant Visa

If the stamp in the passport is endorsed and is near but not on the immigrant visa, it is still a valid endorsement.

In the example above, the employee’s MRIV expires and the employer must update Form I-9 by July 24, 2015.

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Mesures d’assistance à l’immigration liées à l’épidémie d’Ebola pour les ressortissants de Guinée, du Liberia et de Sierra Leone se trouvant actuellement aux Etats-Unis

Date de publication : 15 août 2014

Les services américains de l’immigration (U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services – USCIS) suivent de très près l’évolution de l’épidémie d’Ebola en Afrique de l’Ouest. L’USCIS offre des mesures d’assistance aux ressortissants de ces pays qui se trouvent actuellement aux Etats-Unis.

Ces mesures, disponibles sur demande, sont les suivantes :

  • modification ou extension du statut de non-immigrant pour une personne se trouvant actuellement aux Etats-Unis, même si la demande en est faite après l’expiration de la période d’admission ;
  • extension de certains octrois de libération conditionnelle accordés par l’USCIS ;
  • accélération de l’octroi et de l’accord, lorsque cela est possible, de demandes d’autorisation de travail hors campus pour les étudiants disposant d’un visa F-1 connaissant une grave situation économique ;
  • accélération du traitement des demandes d’immigration pour les proches immédiats (se trouvant actuellement aux Etats-Unis) de citoyens américains ;
  • accélération de l’octroi des demandes d’autorisation de travail, lorsque cela est possible ; et
  • étude des dossiers d’exonération des frais liés aux avantages sociaux de l’USCIS.

Pour en savoir plus sur la manière dont l’USCIS apporte une assistance aux personnes affectées par des circonstances imprévues dans leur pays d’origine, consultez www.uscis.gov/humanitarian/special-situations.

Pour de plus amples informations sur l’USCIS et ses différents programmes, veuillez consulter le site www.uscis.gov, appeler le Centre national de service (National Customer Service Center) au numéro 1-800-375-5283, ou suivre l’USCIS sur Facebook (/uscis), Twitter (@uscis), YouTube (/uscis) et le blog de l’USCIS The Beacon.

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