Official Website of the Department of Homeland Security Official Website of the Department of Homeland Security
Site Identifier Code: 
en
Share This PageShare This Page PrintPrint

Final Rule: Notices of Decisions and Documents Evidencing Lawful Status, Effective Jan. 27, 2015

The final rule, Notices of Decisions and Documents Evidencing Lawful Status, published on Oct. 29, 2014, is effective today, Jan. 27, 2015. This rule amends regulations governing when USCIS will:

  • correspond with,
  • issue a notice of decision to, or
  • provide documents to

an applicant, petitioner, or requester, and/or an attorney of record or accredited representative.

The rule also explains how a person can consent to have such notices and secure identification documents sent directly to a designated representative.

USCIS has updated Form G-28, Notice of Entry of Appearance as Attorney or Accredited Representative, to reflect the changes in this rule. Form G-28 is currently under review by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). USCIS will publish the updated Form G-28 after OMB completes its review and approves the form. Until then, please continue to use the current Form G-28, edition date 02/28/2013.
 

Last Reviewed/Updated:
Share This PageShare This Page PrintPrint
Share This PageShare This Page PrintPrint

Contact myE-Verify

Questions about myE-Verify? We’re here to help. You can find answers to many common questions right here on our website, and we’re always just a phone call or email away if you need us.

Contact myE-Verify

The E-Verify customer call center is able to answer other questions about myE-Verify services including Self Check and other features.

 

myE-Verify and Self Check Customers:

855-804-0296

877-875-6028 (TTY)

Email:

myEVerify@dhs.gov

EVerifySelfCheck@dhs.gov

Website:

http://www.uscis.gov/mye-verify

 

Last Reviewed/Updated:
Share This PageShare This Page PrintPrint

Form I-130 Filing Information for Prospective Adoptive Parents Living Abroad

Who can file an immediate relative petition (Form I-130) on behalf of an adopted child who is neither an “Orphan” nor a Hague Convention Adoptee?

A U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident (“green card” holder) may file an immediate relative Form I-130 petition for an adopted child who did not complete the “orphan” (Form I-600A/I-600) or Hague Convention (Form I-800A/I-800) process if the following requirements are met: 

  • Your child’s adoption was finalized before the child’s 16th birthday (or before the child’s 18th birthday if you also adopted the child’s birth sibling and the birth sibling qualified as an “orphan” or adopted immediate relative child while under the age of 16); and
  • Your child must have resided with you and been in your legal custody (as a result of a formal grant of custody from a court or authorized governmental entity) for at least two years.
    • The custody and residence requirements may be met either before or after the finalized adoption, but any pre-adoption custody must be based on a formal grant of custody obtained according to the law of the country where you obtained custody. 
    • If your child is or was habitually resident in a Hague Convention country prior to the adoption and you adopted the child on or after April 1, 2008, the two-year legal custody and joint residence period generally must be satisfied outside the United States.

Where do I file Form I-130?

The filing location for a Form I-130 depends on where you live.  If you reside in the United States, then you should follow the instructions for domestic filing on the form. 

If you live outside the United States, you may:

  • File with a domestic USCIS lockbox.  Please refer to the instructions on Form I-130 for mailing addresses.
  • File directly with an international USCIS field office if there is one in the country where you live.  For a list of USCIS international offices and filing instructions, please visit the USCIS website.
  • If there is no USCIS office in your country of residence, you may qualify to file Form I-130 due to exceptional circumstances with the Department of State at a U.S Embassy or consulate having jurisdiction over the area where you live. To determine whether you qualify, follow this link to learn more about the exceptional circumstances requirements.  If you believe that you would qualify under these requirements, contact the U.S. Embassy or consulate with jurisdiction over the area where you live to request that your case be processed locally.

Is an adoption abroad considered an exceptional circumstance that would allow for filing my Form I-130 petition at a U.S. Embassy or consulate?

Exceptional circumstances may apply in the case of adoptive parents living abroad who want to file an immediate relative petition for a child they have adopted abroad and there is an imminent need to depart the country.  Some examples include emergent medical needs, changed country conditions, or a job offer or job relocation.  This exception is only available if the child and the petitioner have resided together for at least two years, and the child has been in the petitioner’s legal custody for at least two years.  The petitioner must also have a final adoption decree for the child. 

If the petitioner is an adoptive parent who intends to travel to the United States for a temporary visit and plans to return to their residence abroad, they may wish to explore the N-600K process.

What documentation should I submit when requesting that the Department of State accept a locally filed Form I-130 petition due to exceptional circumstances?

Please submit copies of relevant documentation to support why you believe you qualify for an exceptional circumstance exception.  Some examples would include evidence of a medical emergency, documents related to a job offer or job relocation, or other evidence that indicates an imminent need to depart the country.  This is not an exhaustive list of examples.

Supporting documents must be in English.  Any document that is not in English must be accompanied by a full English translation, and include a translator’s certification that he or she is competent to translate from the original language into English and that the translation is a complete and accurate translation of the entire document.

What documentation should I submit when filing Form I-130?

Please refer to the USCIS website, which outlines the requirements for filing the Form I-130 and provides more detailed information.  USCIS regulations also describe the requirements for a Form I-130 petition.  You can find these on our website.

If I’ve met all eligibility criteria to file Form I-130, what is the process to request local processing at the U.S. Embassy or consulate due to exceptional circumstances?  

  • First, notify the U.S. Embassy or consulate in your country of residence that you would like to request local processing of a Form I-130 petition.  Please contact the U.S. Embassy or consulate directly before attempting to file to determine whether you must schedule an appointment.  When meeting with the consular officer, explain what exceptional circumstances you believe would qualify you for an exception for the U.S. Embassy or consulate to process your Form I-130 petition.
  • The consular officer at the U.S. Embassy or consulate will contact the USCIS Field Office Director with jurisdiction over your place of residence and provide the details of the request and any supporting evidence you submitted.
  • USCIS will determine whether your circumstances meet the “exceptional circumstances” exception criteria and will notify the U.S. Embassy or consulate of the decision.
  • If USCIS determines that you are eligible to file your Form I-130 with the U.S. Embassy or consulate, they will notify the Department of State to accept and adjudicate the petition.
  • If the decision is negative, the Department of State will instruct you that the request was denied and to file the Form I-130 in accordance with the form instructions.
  • If your petition is approved, you will also need to file a visa application.  You may inquire about the procedures and timing for filing a visa application with a consular officer.  Information on any U.S. Embassy or consulate can be found at www.usembassy.gov.

If I live in a country without a USCIS International Office and the USCIS Field Office Director with jurisdiction over my place of residence denies my request to file with the Department of State, can I appeal that decision?

No, there is no right to appeal or request reconsideration of a USCIS decision to deny a request to process Form I-130 on an exceptional basis.

Last Reviewed/Updated:
Share This PageShare This Page PrintPrint

Teleconference Invitation Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA)

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) invited you to participate in a listening session on Monday, Jan. 26, 2015, from 2 to 3:30 p.m. (Eastern) to discuss DAPA, one of the recently announced executive actions on immigration.


On Nov. 20, 2014, President Barack Obama announced a series of executive actions. Under one of those actions, certain parents of U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents who have been living in the country since Jan. 1, 2010, will later be able to request deferred action and employment authorization for three years.  During the listening session,  USCIS officials provided an overview of the new initiatives and seeked your feedback on DAPA.

 

Meeting Invitation

Last Reviewed/Updated:
Share This PageShare This Page PrintPrint

Reminder for Requesting DACA

If you request either initial or renewal Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), you must submit Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization and required fees. USCIS will reject your request if you fail to submit Form I-765, the required filing fee, Form I-765 Worksheet, and Form I-821D, Consideration of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. For complete instructions on requesting DACA, go to the Consideration of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) page.

For DACA renewals, USCIS strongly encourages you to submit your renewal request between 150 days and 120 days before the expiration date located on your current Form I-797 DACA approval notice and Employment Authorization Document. Filing during this window will minimize the possibility that your current period of DACA will expire before you receive a decision on your renewal request.

USCIS’ current goal is to process DACA renewal requests within 120 days. However, you may submit an inquiry about the status of your renewal request after it has been pending more than 105 days. To submit an inquiry, please visit egov.uscis.gov/e-request or call the National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 (TDD for the hearing impaired: 1-800-767-1833)

Last Reviewed/Updated:
Share This PageShare This Page PrintPrint

Revised Form I-129 Now Available

USCIS recently published revised Form I-129, Petition for a Nonimmigrant Worker. The revised Form I-129 is labeled with an Oct. 23, 2014, edition date. You can download the revised form and details about who may file Form I-129 from the USCIS forms website.

Starting on May 1, 2015, USCIS will accept only the Oct. 23, 2014, edition of Form I-129. USCIS will not accept previous editions of Forms I-129 (edition dates: Oct. 7, 2011, Jan. 19, 2011, and Nov. 23, 2010) on or after May 1, 2015.
USCIS recommends that you download the revised form, which prompts customers to fill out the form completely and helps improve USCIS’ ability to process the form.
 

Last Reviewed/Updated:
Share This PageShare This Page PrintPrint

Administrative Appeals Office : Office Updates and Regulatory Changes Listening Session


U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) invited you to participate in a stakeholder teleconference and listening session on Wednesday, May 28, 2014, from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. (Eastern) regarding recent developments relating to the Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) and appeals processing.

During the first part of this engagement, USCIS provided AAO program updates. The second part of the engagement included a listening session in which individual stakeholders provided feedback on areas of potential regulatory reforms and improvements to appeals processing. USCIS is exploring options to update, clarify, and simplify current DHS regulations for appeals and motions, including the scope of the AAO’s appellate jurisdiction.

 

Meeting Invitation

 

AAO May 28 Stakeholder Engagement Summary

Last Reviewed/Updated:
Share This PageShare This Page PrintPrint

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Expansion

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) invited you to participate in a listening session on Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2015, from 2 to 3:30 p.m. (Eastern) to discuss the expansion of DACA as part of the recently announced executive actions on immigration.


On Nov. 20, President Barack Obama announced a series of executive actions, including expanding DACA to individuals of any age who came to this country before turning 16 years old and have been present since Jan. 1, 2010. This expansion of DACA will go into effect approximately 90 days following the announcement. The actions also extend the period of DACA and work authorization from two years to three years. During the listening session, USCIS officials provided an overview of the new initiatives and your feedback on DACA expansion.

 

Meeting Invitation

Last Reviewed/Updated:
Share This PageShare This Page PrintPrint

Teleconference Invitation Dialogue with USCIS Director León Rodríguez

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) invited you to participate in a stakeholder teleconference on Thursday, Jan. 22 from 2-3 p.m. (Eastern), with USCIS Director León Rodríguez.


Director Rodríguez highlighted agency initiatives and listened and responded to issues of concern to the stakeholder community.


 

Meeting Invitation

Last Reviewed/Updated:

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - USCIS.gov - English