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The Cuban Family Reunification Parole (CFRP) Program

Created in 2007, the CFRP Program allows certain eligible U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents to apply for parole for their family members in Cuba. If granted parole, these family members may come to the United States without waiting for their immigrant visa priority dates to become current. Once in the United States, CFRP Program beneficiaries may apply for work authorization while they wait to apply for lawful permanent resident status.

NOTE: Do NOT attempt to come to the United States by boat. These trips are potentially life-threatening, and you will NOT qualify for the CFRP Program if you make such a journey.  If located at sea, you may be returned to Cuba.

Eligibility for CFRP

If you filed a Form I-130 for your relative, you are known as the petitioner and your relative is known as the beneficiary. You will be eligible to apply for parole for your relative(s) in Cuba under the CFRP program if:

  • You are either a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident (LPR);
  • You have an approved Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative, for a Cuban family member;
  • An immigrant visa is not yet available for your relative; and
  • You received an invitation from the Department of State’s National Visa Center (NVC) to participate in the CFRP Program. Please see the Applying for CFRP section below for more details.

To be eligible, the beneficiary must:

  • Be a Cuban national residing in Cuba; and
  • Have a petitioner who has been invited to participate in the CFRP Program.

NOTE: Immediate relatives of U.S. citizens are NOT eligible for CFRP because they can immediately apply for immigrant visas once their Form I-130 is approved. Immediate relatives are: (1) spouses of U.S. citizens, (2) unmarried children under 21 years old of U.S. citizens, and (3) parents of U.S. citizens over 21 years of age.

Applying for CFRP

Do NOT apply for the CFRP program until the NVC invites you to do so. Potential beneficiaries in Cuba cannot apply for themselves.

Updating your mailing address

If you are a petitioner who believes that you may be eligible for the CFRP program, please make sure that the NVC has your current mailing address. You can contact the NVC with your current address by calling (603) 334-0700An image or emailing asknvc@state.gov. For additional contact information, please visit:   http://travel.state.gov/content/visas/english/immigrate/nvc/nvc-contact-information.html

What you must submit in order to apply for the CFRP Program depends on when you received a written invitation or an eligibility notice from the NVC to apply for the CFRP Program. Please note that people in Cuba cannot apply for themselves.

 

If you received an eligibility notice from the NVC BEFORE December 18, 2014, and…

What you must submit

You submitted to the NVC all necessary documents to apply for the CFRP program before February 17, 2015. Documents are submitted if they are postmarked prior to February 17, 2015.

 

You do not need to submit a form or fee to apply for parole under the CFRP program.

 

You did NOT apply to the CFRP Program by submitting all necessary documents to the NVC before February 17, 2015.

You must wait for the NVC to send you a new written invitation before you can apply for the CFRP Program.

Once you receive the invitation, you must:

The invitation letter will specify where and how the application should be filed. You must not submit any application materials to USCIS before first receiving the invitation letter from the NVC.

USCIS will reject CFRP applications submitted on or after February 17, 2015, that do not include the completed Form I-131 and fee (or a fee waiver request).

 

 

If you received a written invitation from the NVC on or after February 17, 2015

You must:

The invitation letter will specify where and how the application should be filed. You must not submit any application materials to USCIS before first receiving the invitation letter from the NVC.

USCIS will reject CFRP applications that do not include the completed Form I-131 and fee (or a fee waiver request).

 

 

You have not received a written invitation from the NVC yet

You must wait for the NVC to send you a written invitation before you can apply for the CFRP Program.

The invitation letter will specify where and how the application should be filed. You must not submit any application materials to USCIS before first receiving the invitation letter from the NVC.

Fees

USCIS has not previously required CFRP applicants to submit a form or a fee for a parole request. USCIS used the fees paid by applicants for other immigration benefits to cover the operating expenses for the CFRP Program.

After a review of the CFRP Program, USCIS has decided to bring the CFRP Program into line with the majority of parole requests made on behalf of persons outside the United States. Anyone filing a CFRP application who received a written invitation from the NVC on or after February 17, 2015, will now need to submit the fee required by USCIS fee regulations in Title 8, Code of Federal Regulations section 103.7(b)(1)(i)(M).

The fee due is the fee for the Form I-131; CFRP applicants may also apply for a fee waiver. Applicants may request a fee waiver by submitting Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver. For instructions, please see USCIS’s Fee Waiver Guidance.

Being granted parole under the CFRP Program

USCIS will complete a documentary review of the evidence provided by the petitioner with the CFRP application. If the application appears approvable, it will be forwarded to the U.S. Interests Section in Havana, Cuba, by the NVC. USCIS or the Department of State (DOS) will interview the beneficiary in Havana, Cuba, to determine whether to grant parole. Beneficiaries may also have to provide biometrics (fingerprints and photos).

The grant of parole is not automatic. USCIS will use its discretion to grant parole on a case-by-case basis. USCIS will only grant parole to beneficiaries who meet the CFRP eligibility requirements and also:

Cubans who have committed serious crimes or who fail to pass security checks will not be granted parole.

Beware of scams!

Visit our website, www.uscis.gov/avoidscams, for tips on filing forms, reporting scams, and finding accredited legal services.

Please remember that official U.S. government websites end with ".gov" and that information on these official websites is official and correct. Official U.S. government email addresses also end in “.gov.” If you receive any emails about your cases from an email address that does not end with “.gov,” you should beware that it is a scam.

After USCIS grants parole

If USCIS grants parole under the CFRP Program, the Department of State or USCIS will issue the necessary travel documents to the beneficiary in Cuba. These travel documents will allow the beneficiary to travel to the United States and seek parole from a Customs and Border Protection Officer at a port-of-entry.

Beneficiaries should NOT take any irrevocable actions—such as selling or buying property, terminating employment, or withdrawing from school—until they have their CFRP travel document in their hands.

Parole

The Immigration and Nationality Act gives USCIS the authority to use its discretion to grant parole for urgent humanitarian or significant public benefit reasons.

Parole allows an individual to be lawfully present in the U.S. and to apply for work authorization. Parole does not confer any legal immigration status in the United States.

However, the 1966 Cuban Refugee Adjustment Act permits Cubans paroled into the United States to apply to become lawful permanent residents (LPRs) after being present in the United States for one year.

A Cuban paroled into the U.S. under the CFRP Program meets the definition of a Cuban entrant.

Background

The 1994/1995 U.S.-Cuba Migration Accords commit the United States to ensuring that total legal migration to the United States from Cuba will be a minimum of 20,000 Cubans each year, not including immediate relatives of U.S. citizens. In 2007, USCIS launched the CFRP program to help the United States meet its annual obligations under the Accords.

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The Haitian Family Reunification Parole (HFRP) Program

The HFRP Program allows certain eligible U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents to apply for parole for their family members in Haiti. If granted, the parole allows these family members to come to the United States up to two years before their immigrant visa priority dates becomes current. Once in the United States, these individuals may then apply for work authorization while they are waiting to apply for lawful permanent resident status.

NOTE: Do NOT attempt to come to the United States by boat. These trips are potentially life-threatening, and you will NOT qualify for the HFRP Program if you make such a journey. If located at sea, you may be returned to Haiti.

Eligibility for HFRP

If you filed a Form I-130 for your relative, you are known as the petitioner and your relative is known as the beneficiary. You will be eligible to apply for parole for your relative(s) in Haiti under the HFRP Program if:

  • You are either a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident (LPR);
  • You filed a Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative, for a Haitian family member and it was approved on or before December 18, 2014;
  • An immigrant visa is not yet available for your relative;
  • You received an invitation from the Department of State’s National Visa Center (NVC) to participate in the HFRP Program.  Please see the “Applying for HFRP” section below for more details.

To be eligible, the beneficiary must:

  • Be a Haitian national residing in Haiti; and
  • Have a petitioner who has been invited to participate in the HFRP program.
NOTE: Immediate relatives of U.S. citizens are NOT eligible for HFRP because they can immediately apply for immigrant visas once their Form I-130 is approved. Immediate relatives are: (1) spouses of U.S. citizens, (2) unmarried children under 21 years old of U.S. citizens, and (3) parents of U.S. citizens over 21 years of age.

Applying for HFRP

Do NOT apply for the HFRP program until the NVC invites you to do so. Potential beneficiaries in Haiti cannot apply for themselves.

Updating your mailing address

If you are a petitioner who believes that you may be eligible for the HFRP program, please make sure that the NVC has your current mailing address. You can contact the NVC with your current address by calling (603) 334-0700An image or emailing asknvc@state.gov. For additional contact information, please visit:   http://travel.state.gov/content/visas/english/immigrate/nvc/nvc-contact-information.html

Before a petitioner can apply for the HFRP Program, he or she must receive an invitation to participate from the NVC. Each year, the NVC will identify the Forms I-130 with priority dates that are expected to become current within the next 18 to 30 months, and will mail written invitation letters to the petitioners who filed these petitions.

The invitation letter will include instructions on how to:

The invitation letter will specify where and how the application should be filed and provide additional important instructions. You must not submit any application materials to USCIS before first receiving the invitation letter from the NVC.

USCIS will reject all HFRP applications that do not include the completed Form I-131 and fee (or a fee waiver request).

Fees

The fee due is the fee for the Form I-131; HFRP applicants may also apply for a fee waiver. Applicants may request a fee waiver by submitting Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver. For instructions, please see USCIS’s Fee Waiver Guidance.  Please also see the “Estimated costs associated with becoming a lawful permanent resident” section below for important information.

Being granted parole under the HFRP Program

USCIS will complete a documentary review of the evidence provided by the petitioner with the HFRP application. If the application appears approvable, it will be forwarded to the U.S. Embassy in Haiti by the NVC.  USCIS or the Department of State (DOS) will interview the beneficiary in Port au Prince, Haiti, to determine whether to grant parole. Beneficiaries may also have to provide biometrics (fingerprints and photos).

The grant of parole is not automatic. USCIS will use its discretion to grant parole on a case-by-case basis. USCIS will only grant parole to beneficiaries who:

  • Meet all the HFRP eligibility requirements;
  • Meet all the eligibility requirements for an immigrant visa (except for the requirement that the immigrant visa number be available);
  • Pass security background checks;
  • Pass a medical examination; and
  • Are admissible to the United States.

Haitians who have committed serious crimes or who fail to pass security checks will not be granted parole.  

After USCIS grants parole

If USCIS grants parole under the HFRP Program, USCIS or the Department of State will issue the necessary travel documents to the beneficiary in Haiti. These travel documents will allow the beneficiary to travel to the United States and seek parole from a Customs and Border Protection Officer at a port of entry.

Beware of scams!
Visit our website, www.uscis.gov/avoidscams, for tips on filing forms, reporting scams, and finding accredited legal services.

Please remember that official U.S. government websites end with ".gov" and that information on these official websites is official and correct. Official U.S. government email addresses also end in “.gov.” If you receive any emails about your cases from an email address that does not end with “.gov,” you should beware that it is a scam.

Parole

The Immigration and Nationality Act gives USCIS the authority to use its discretion to grant parole for urgent humanitarian or significant public benefit reasons.

Parole allows an individual to be lawfully present in the U.S. and to apply for work authorization. Parole itself does not confer any legal immigration status in the United States.

However, HFRP Program beneficiaries paroled into the U.S. are expected to apply for lawful permanent resident status as soon as their immigrant visa becomes available—generally within two years of being paroled into the United States.

A Haitian paroled into the U.S. under the HFRP Program will meet the definition of a Haitian entrant.

Estimated costs associated with becoming a lawful permanent resident

To work in the United States, HFRP Program beneficiaries will have to file Form I-765 , Application for Employment Authorization, after arrival in the U.S. The fee is $380 but applicants can request a fee waiver by submitting Form I-1912, Request for Fee Waiver .  For instructions, please see USCIS Fee Waiver Guidance .

As beneficiaries of this program, your relatives will be expected to apply for lawful permanent resident status once their visas become “current” (meaning available). USCIS anticipates that visas for HFRP Program beneficiaries will become current approximately two years after they are paroled into the United States.

Your relatives must pay to obtain lawful permanent resident status (green card). In order to apply for a green card, they must file Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status, once their visa is current. The fee is $1,070. No fee waiver is available.

The total cost to obtain work authorization and become a lawful permanent resident if first paroled into the United States under the HFRP Program is roughly $1,810. In comparison, the cost for an individual to enter the United States with an immigrant visa is approximately $610. An individual entering as an immigrant has lawful permanent resident status and is authorized to work upon admission, so no additional costs are required to obtain those immigration benefits.

In rare cases, a person’s immigrant visa may become available while his or her case is being processed under the HFRP Program. In those cases, the person may continue to be processed for parole, or he or she may choose to be processed by the Department of State for an immigrant visa. The person will be required to pay any fees associated with that process, and USCIS will not refund the HFRP Program application fee.

 

Form/Action

 

Options and Associated Costs to Obtain

Lawful Permanent Residence (Green Card)

Immigrant Visa (IV)

HFRP Program plus Adjustment of Status

Apply for HFRP Program, then switch to IV

I-131, Application for Travel Document

-

$360

$360

Immigrant Visa Application Processing Fee (for approved I-130, Petition for Alien Relative)

$325

 

$325

Department of State Affidavit of Support Review

$120

-

$120

USCIS Immigrant Fee

$165

-

$165

I-765, Application for Employment Authorization ($380)**

-

$380

 

I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status + biometrics ($985 + $85)

-

$1,070

 

Total Cost Per Person*

$610

$1,810

$970

*Fees valid as of December 18, 2014, and are subject to change.

** Not required to adjust to lawful permanent resident status, however, if an HFRP beneficiary wishes to work in the U.S. before obtaining his or her green card, he or she must apply for work authorization.  An individual who enters the U.S. as an immigrant is eligible to work upon admission and does not need to apply for work authorization.

Note: These costs are those associated with the immigration paths outlined above to become a lawful permanent resident and are not meant to represent any other costs or benefits which may be associated with parole or lawful permanent resident status in the U.S.

 

Background

USCIS created the HFRP Program on December 18, 2014, to promote family unity by reducing the time that U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents are separated from their relatives in Haiti. The program also supports broader U.S. goals for Haiti’s long-term reconstruction and development by allowing the beneficiaries of the HFRP Program to work in the United States and contribute to Haiti through their remittances, if they wish to do so.

USCIS aims to benefit as many individuals as possible with the HFRP program while also considering the operational capabilities of the U.S. government, especially the U.S. Embassy in Port-au-Prince, and the resources available to aid program beneficiaries.

USCIS anticipates conducting approximately 5,000 HFRP Program interviews annually. This volume may fluctuate each year depending on the operational capabilities of the U.S. Embassy in Port-au-Prince and on the number of individuals who apply for the program when invited to do so.

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Kathleen Stanley, Chief, Office of Transformation Coordination

Kathleen Stanley is the Chief of the Office of Transformation Coordination. She assumed her role on Oct. 7, 2012.

Background Experience/Significant Achievements:

Ms. Stanley has over 30 years of experience in program management, auditing, financial policy and analysis, and financial operations. Before serving in her current role, she was responsible for managing USCIS's forms design, printing and distribution processes, application intake and fee collection, and the production and delivery of secure proof of benefit documents.

Ms. Stanley started her career with the Government Accountability Office and has held leadership roles at the Department of Defense's Office of the Inspector General, the Immigration and Naturalization Service and various offices within USCIS.

Education:

Ms. Stanley has a Bachelor of Science in Business with an emphasis on accounting from Virginia Commonwealth University.

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Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Renewal Process

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) invited you to participate in a stakeholder teleconference on Thursday, Dec. 18, 2014, from 4 to 5 p.m. (Eastern) to discuss the DACA renewal process.

On June 5, 2014, USCIS announced a DACA renewal process and published a revised Form I-821D, Consideration of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, that individuals must use to renew or request DACA for the first time. On Nov. 20, 2014, the president announced a series of executive actions on immigration, including extending the period of DACA and work authorization from two years to three years.

During the teleconference, USCIS officials shared information about the DACA renewal process and extended DACA validity period, as well as answered general questions.

If you have any questions, please email us at Public.Engagement@uscis.dhs.gov.

Meeting Invitation

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USCIS Announces 68 Countries Eligible to Participate in the H-2A and H-2B Visa Programs

USCIS and the Department of Homeland Security, in consultation with the Department of State, has added the Czech Republic, Denmark, Madagascar, Portugal, and Sweden to the list of countries whose nationals are eligible to participate in the H-2A and H-2B Visa programs for the coming year. The notice listing the 68 eligible countries published on Dec. 16, 2014 in the Federal Register.

The H-2A and H-2B Visa programs allow U.S. employers to bring foreign nationals to the United States to fill temporary agricultural and nonagricultural jobs, respectively. USCIS only approves H-2A and H-2B petitions for nationals of countries the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as eligible to participate in the programs. USCIS may approve H-2A and H-2B petitions for nationals of countries not on the list if it is determined to be in the interest of the United States.

Effective Jan. 18, 2015, nationals of the following 68 countries are eligible to participate in the H-2A and H-2B Visa programs:

 

Argentina

Fiji

Moldova

Slovenia

Australia

Grenada

Montenegro

Solomon Islands

Austria

Guatemala

Nauru

South Africa

Barbados

Haiti

The Netherlands

South Korea

Belize

Honduras

Nicaragua

Spain

Brazil

Hungary

New Zealand

Sweden

Bulgaria

Iceland

Norway

Switzerland

Canada

Ireland

Panama

Thailand

Chile

Israel

Papua New Guinea

Tonga

Costa Rica

Italy

Peru

Turkey

Croatia

Jamaica

The Philippines

Tuvalu

Czech Republic

Japan

Poland

Ukraine

Denmark

Kiribati

Portugal

United Kingdom

Dominican Republic

Latvia

Romania

Uruguay

Ecuador

Lithuania

Samoa

Vanuatu

El Salvador

Macedonia

Serbia

 

Estonia

Madagascar

Slovakia

 

Ethiopia

Mexico

 

This notice does not affect the status of beneficiaries who currently are in the United States in H-2A or H-2B status unless they apply to change or extend their status. Each country’s designation is valid for one year from Jan. 18, 2015.

For more information on USCIS and its programs please visit www.uscis.gov.

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USCIS Approves 10,000 U Visas for 6th Straight Fiscal Year

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has approved the statutory maximum of 10,000 petitions for U-1 nonimmigrant status (U visas) for fiscal year 2015. This marks the sixth straight year that USCIS has reached the statutory maximum since it began issuing U visas in 2008.

Each year, 10,000 U visas are available for victims of certain qualifying crimes who have suffered substantial mental or physical abuse and are willing to help law enforcement authorities investigate or prosecute those crimes. A U visa petition requires certification that the victim has been helpful to law enforcement.

Although USCIS has reached the statutory cap of 10,000 U visas, it will continue to review pending petitions for eligibility. For eligible petitioners who cannot be granted a U-1 visas solely because of the cap, USCIS will send a letter notifying them that they are on a waiting list to receive a U visa when visas become available again. The letter will also inform the petitioners of options available to them while they are on the waiting list. Petitioners and qualifying family members must continue to meet eligibility requirements at the time the U visa is issued.

USCIS will resume issuing U visas on Oct. 1, 2015, the first day of fiscal year 2016, when visas become available again.

Congress created the U visa program to strengthen the law enforcement community’s ability to investigate and prosecute cases of domestic violence, sexual assault, human trafficking, and other crimes, while also offering protection to victims. More than 116,471 victims and their family members have received U visas since the program began in 2008.

Visit www.uscis.gov for more information about the U visa on our Victims of Criminal Activity Web page.

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Applicant Performance on the Naturalization Test - September 2014

91% National Pass Rate as of September 2014Section 312 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) requires that naturalization applicants must demonstrate an ability to read, write, and speak words in ordinary usage in the English language, and have a knowledge and understanding of U.S. history and government (civics). To meet the requirements of Section 312 of the INA, applicants must pass a naturalization test to become naturalized citizens. The naturalization test consists of two components – an English and a civics component.

As part of a multi-year redesign, the naturalization test was modified to achieve two basic objectives:

  • A uniform and consistent testing experience for all applicants
  • A civics test that can effectively assess an applicant’s knowledge of U.S. history and government

The new test’s content emphasizes the founding principles of American democracy and the rights and responsibilities of citizenship while also serving as an important instrument to encourage civic learning and attachment to the country.

On October 1, 2008, USCIS began administering the new naturalization test. Up until October 1, 2009, applicants who had filed for naturalization before October 1, 2008, had a choice of taking the old test or the new test. On October 1, 2009, following a one-year transition, the new test became mandatory for all naturalization applicants. The pass rate above represents the cumulative pass rate of applicants who took the new test since it was fully implemented on October 1, 2009, through September 30, 2014.

From October 1, 2009, through September 30, 2014 more than 3,760,000 naturalization tests were administered nationwide. For those applicants taking both the English and civics tests, the overall national pass rate as of September 2014 is 91 percent.

Background on the Data

USCIS plans to provide information on a monthly basis on the overall national pass rate of applicants who were administered the naturalization test. The data reflected above were taken from internal case management systems used to track naturalization applications and have been gathered to provide a general snapshot of how applicants are performing on the naturalization test. 

The overall national pass rate is determined based solely on an applicant's first test within the current naturalization application. The data represent applicants taking the new naturalization test from October 1, 2009 through September 30, 2014. Please note that test results for each applicant are manually entered into the case management system and some errors may occur during manual entry. Although every effort has been undertaken to eliminate any errors made during manual data entry, errors may exist that would impact the publicized national pass rate.

Records Study

As a final step in the test redesign process, USCIS conducted a series of records studies to evaluate applicant performance on the test. These studies identified an overall pass rate of 95.8 percent for the new test during fiscal year 2010, the first full year when the new test was administered.

A Records Study Comparison Report analyzed pass rate data for the old and new tests as well as pass rate data from a previous records study (from fiscal years 2003 and 2004). This report captured, analyzed and compared applicant performance by demographic characteristics in three categories: gender, age and region of nationality. The studies show that applicant performance on the new test improved compared to the old test. Based on the results of the fiscal year 2010 records study, applicant performance is generally consistent with the pass rate reflected in USCIS’s ongoing analysis of internal case management data.

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Applicant Performance on the Naturalization Test - August 2014

91% National Pass Rate as of August 2014Section 312 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) requires that naturalization applicants must demonstrate an ability to read, write, and speak words in ordinary usage in the English language, and have a knowledge and understanding of U.S. history and government (civics). To meet the requirements of Section 312 of the INA, applicants must pass a naturalization test to become naturalized citizens. The naturalization test consists of two components – an English and a civics component.

As part of a multi-year redesign, the naturalization test was modified to achieve two basic objectives:

  • A uniform and consistent testing experience for all applicants
  • A civics test that can effectively assess an applicant’s knowledge of U.S. history and government

The new test’s content emphasizes the founding principles of American democracy and the rights and responsibilities of citizenship while also serving as an important instrument to encourage civic learning and attachment to the country.

On October 1, 2008, USCIS began administering the new naturalization test. Up until October 1, 2009, applicants who had filed for naturalization before October 1, 2008, had a choice of taking the old test or the new test. On October 1, 2009, following a one-year transition, the new test became mandatory for all naturalization applicants. The pass rate above represents the cumulative pass rate of applicants who took the new test since it was fully implemented on October 1, 2009, through August 31, 2014.

From October 1, 2009, through August 31, 2014 more than 3,690,000 naturalization tests were administered nationwide. For those applicants taking both the English and civics tests, the overall national pass rate as of August 2014 is 91 percent.

Background on the Data

USCIS plans to provide information on a monthly basis on the overall national pass rate of applicants who were administered the naturalization test. The data reflected above were taken from internal case management systems used to track naturalization applications and have been gathered to provide a general snapshot of how applicants are performing on the naturalization test. 

The overall national pass rate is determined based solely on an applicant's first test within the current naturalization application. The data represent applicants taking the new naturalization test from October 1, 2009 through August 31, 2014. Please note that test results for each applicant are manually entered into the case management system and some errors may occur during manual entry. Although every effort has been undertaken to eliminate any errors made during manual data entry, errors may exist that would impact the publicized national pass rate.

Records Study

As a final step in the test redesign process, USCIS conducted a series of records studies to evaluate applicant performance on the test. These studies identified an overall pass rate of 95.8 percent for the new test during fiscal year 2010, the first full year when the new test was administered.

A Records Study Comparison Report analyzed pass rate data for the old and new tests as well as pass rate data from a previous records study (from fiscal years 2003 and 2004). This report captured, analyzed and compared applicant performance by demographic characteristics in three categories: gender, age and region of nationality. The studies show that applicant performance on the new test improved compared to the old test. Based on the results of the fiscal year 2010 records study, applicant performance is generally consistent with the pass rate reflected in USCIS’s ongoing analysis of internal case management data.

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USCIS Online Customer Service Tools Teleconference

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) invited you to participate in a teleconference on Friday, Dec. 19 from 1-2 p.m. (Eastern) to discuss updates to USCIS online customer service tools.


During this engagement, we provided an overview of the updates. We recently enhanced our Case Status Online service to provide a better experience for customers. As of Nov. 7, account holders can view their case history, status of service requests and estimated timelines for receiving documents or notices from USCIS.


Customer Service and Public Engagement Directorate staff was available to demonstrate the new features and answer questions.


Meeting Invitation

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Revamped USCIS Careers Website and Job-Seeker Resources for Employees

USCIS has redesigned www.uscis.gov/careers to make it easier for job seekers to learn about vacancies, special hiring programs, benefits, career development opportunities and the hiring process. A new “Life at USCIS” section features first-person perspectives of employees across the agency. This section will rotate profiles to highlight the variety of positions and backgrounds of our people and the skills we need to oversee lawful immigration to the United States.

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