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USCIS Arabic-Language Engagement

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) invites you to participate in a national Arabic-language engagement. Agency representatives will be available to share updates and answer your questions.

Topic: Naturalization-How to become a U.S. Citizen

Date: Wednesday, 11/19/2014

Time: 5:30-7:00 p.m. (Eastern)

Join us: In person at the Arab American National Museum
                                  13624 Michigan Avenue, Dearborn, MI 48126

Via Toll-Free number: 1-888-769-9409 Password: Musharakah
Via Live Web Stream: www.uscis.gov/live/musharakah

Note: Submit your questions in advance via Twitter to @USCIS or during the event via email at OPE-Live@uscis.dhs.gov
To learn more about USCIS’ multilingual resources, email us at public.engagement@uscis.dhs.gov or visit www.uscis.gov/multilingual

 

Download the English invitation for this engagement
Download the Arabic invitation for this engagement

 

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Haiti - Port-au-Prince Office Field Office

ALERT: USCIS Changes International District Names

Field Office Director

Hichem Kefi

Service Area 

The Port-au-Prince Field Office has jurisdiction over U.S. immigration benefits in the French-speaking islands of the West Indies. The islands include: Haiti, Guadeloupe, Martinique, St. Barthelemy and St. Martin.

Street Address

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services / DHS
U.S. Embassy
Boulevard 15 Octobre, Tabarre
Port-au-Prince, Haiti, W.I.

Mailing Address from the US 

Field Office Director
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services / DHS
United States Embassy
3400 Port-au-Prince Place
Washington, D.C. 20521-3400

Mailing Address from Outside the US 

Information not available.

Express Mail address 

Information not available.

Office Location

We are located a few miles away from the International Airport, in the New Embassy Compound in Tabarre and across the street from the Valerio Canez show room. Our office is next door to the Capital Coach Line and the United Nations buildings.

Hours of Operation 

The office is open to the public, Monday through Friday from 7:30AM to 2:30PM.

To obtain information regarding the welfare of U.S. citizens residing in Haiti, please visit the Dept. of State website at http://haiti.usembassy.gov/index.html or call 1-888-407-4747.

Phone, Fax Numbers & Email 

Phone:
From the U.S. dial: 011-509-2229-8000 extension 8409.
From within Haiti dial: 509-2229-8000

Fax:
Please send faxes to 011-509-2229-8082.

E-mail:
Please send e-mails to haiti.uscis@uscis.dhs.gov

Visiting the office in person 

Appointments:
For an appointment you need to contact the USCIS office, by phone, between 1:30 PM and 2:30 PM.

Walk-ins:
Walk-ins are accepted in our office on a first come-first served basis by following the new schedule.

Public Transportation

Information not available.

Parking & Handicap Accessibility 

Accessibility for individuals with special needs is available.

Paying Fees 

Fees for applications and petitions are listed in the Forms section of the USCIS website. The fees for all applications and petitions submitted to this office must be paid with either U.S. dollars, in Cash or Certified Checks drawn on a U.S. Bank, or a U.S. banking institution..

Customer Feedback 

We strive to provide quality service to our customers. If we have not lived up to this commitment or if we have met or exceeded your expectations, please let us know. To comment on the services provided at this office, please write to the Field Office Director at the address given above, or to the:
District Director
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
PO Box 9000,
Brownsville, TX 78520

If you feel you were mistreated by a U.S. immigration employee, or wish to make a complaint of misconduct by a U.S. immigration employee, you may write to the District Director, or write directly to the:
Department of Homeland Security
USCIS
Attn: Chief, International Operations Division
20 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Suite 3300
Washington, DC 20529-2100

Forms

Immigration forms are available in the Forms section of the USCIS website which can be found to your right under Related Links.

Visas

For in-depth information about visas, please check the Visa Services section of the U.S. Department of State website.

Form I-407 

The abandonment of lawful permanent resident status is irrevocable. An individual who relinquishes lawful permanent resident status must qualify again for such status. Therefore, one should give careful thought to abandoning lawful permanent resident status.

If you wish to abandon your permanent residence and relinquish your Permanent Resident Card (Green Card), requests may be submitted to the Port-au-Prince office, by mail or in person, during normal business hours.

All documents that are not in the English language must be accompanied by a certified English language translation.

Forms I-600 & I-600A 

Form I-600 (Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative) and I-600A (Application for Advance Processing of Orphan Petition) must be submitted to the immigration office having jurisdiction over the place of adoption.

The USCIS Port-au-Prince Field Office participates in the Orphan First Pilot Program.

All documents that are not in the English language must be accompanied by a certified English language translation.

In addition to reviewing the information under the Adoption section on the USCIS website, which can be found to your right under Related Links, we also encourage U.S. citizens with pending adoption cases in Haiti to visit the U.S. Department of State website at www.adoption.state.gov for more information and updates.

Form I-130 

U.S. citizens who legally reside in Haiti may file Form I-130 (Petition for Alien Relative) at the Port-au-Prince Field Office by mail or in person during normal business hours.

All documents that are not in the English language must be accompanied by a certified English language translation.

Form N-400 

U.S. Immigration offices overseas do not accept or process Naturalization applications from U.S. Lawful Permanent Residents (LPRs) that live overseas. Visit the Citizenship section of the USCIS Website for Naturalization eligibility criteria and the proper filing procedures.

Form I-131 Parole 

The Port-au-Prince Field Office does not issue Humanitarian Parole. Individuals must apply for Humanitarian parole by submitting their applications to:
USCIS Dallas Lockbox
For US Postal Service (USPS) Deliveries:
USCIS
PO Box 660865
Dallas, TX. 75266

For Express mail and courier deliveries:
USCIS
Attn: HP
2501 S. State Hwy 121, Business
Suite 400
Lewisville, TX 75067

Instructions on how to file an application for Humanitarian Parole are located on Form I-131.

Form I-131 Re-entry 

The Port-au-Prince Field Office does not issue or extend re-entry permits. Instructions on how to obtain or replace a Re-Entry permit are in the How Do I Get A Travel Document section of the USCIS website which can be found to your right under Related Links.

Form I-590 

The Port-au-Prince Field Office does not directly accept refugee resettlement applications. These should be filed with the State Department's local designated voluntary agencies in Port-au-Prince. We are also unable to check the status of any pending refugee resettlement application. Please contact the voluntary agency to which the application was submitted. Inquiries on previously rejected refugee applications should also be addressed to the voluntary agency with which the application was submitted.

For general information and processing criteria please see the Department of State website and the Refugee section of the USCIS website which can be found to your right under Related Links.

Filing Form I-601 and I-212 from Abroad

If you are abroad and otherwise approved to immigrate to the United States, but a Department of State Consular Officer found you ineligible to enter because of one or more grounds of inadmissibility for which a waiver may be available, you may apply for a waiver by filing Form I-601, Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility.

If you left the United States voluntarily after being issued an order of deportation or removal, were deported or removed, or re-entered the U.S. unlawfully after previously accumulating more than one year of unlawful presence, you may apply for readmission to the U.S. by filing Form I-212, Application for Permission to Reapply for Admission Into the United States After Deportation or Removal.

Where to File

On June 4, 2012, USCIS changed where waiver applications are filed. This will provide more efficient and consistent application processing, and allow you to track your case status online. You may also request an email or text message confirming receipt of your waiver by completing and attaching Form G-1145, E-Notification of Application/Petition Acceptance to your application.

Waiver applications and supporting evidence should be mailed directly to the USCIS Lockbox. You may find the address for the appropriate USCIS Lockbox in the form instructions, as well as in the USCIS website at:

 

Please see the policy memorandum, Exceptions for Permitting the Filing of Form I-601, Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility, and any associated Form I-212, Application for Permission to Reapply for Admission into the United States After Deportation or Removal, at an International USCIS Offices, for more information.

I-601 Expedited Adjudication Requests

If you are sending your application to the USCIS Lockbox and believe you have extraordinary circumstances that are time-sensitive and compelling, you may attach a written request to have your application expedited at the time of filing.

If you have already submitted your application to the Lockbox, you can make an expedite request by either contacting the Nebraska Service Center (NSC) directly by email, or by calling the USCIS National Customer Service Center.

For information on how to contact the NSC and our National Customer Service Center, please visit the Contact Us page on the USCIS website.

Transportation Boarding Letters 

A transportation letter may be issued to a U.S. Lawful Permanent Resident to replace a lost or stolen Alien Registration Card (Form I-551) by visiting the Port-au-Prince office during normal business hours.

The following documents will be required:
1. Proper Identification
2. Police Report
3. Proof of Residence in the United States within the last year.

Information Notification Updates 
The USCIS Port-au-Prince Field Office requires all documents, which are submitted in support of an application or petition, must be accompanied by a certified English language translation if they are not in the English language.

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Adoption Information: Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)

On September 27, 2013, the Congolese Ministry of Interior and Security, General Direction of Migration (Direction Generale d’Immigration, referred to as DGM) informed the U.S. Embassy in Kinshasa that effective September 25, 2013, the DGM was no longer issuing exit permits to adopted Congolese children seeking to depart the country with their adoptive parents. These exit permits, along with U.S. immigrant visas, are required for children traveling to the United States from the DRC.   

The DGM further clarified that the Ministry of Gender and Family will not process any pending or new applications for approval of adoptions during the suspension of exit permits. Therefore, although Congolese courts may continue issuing adoption decrees under Congolese law, the adopted children will not be able to legally depart the country without an exit permit issued by the DGM while the suspension remains in effect.

USCIS Processing Options for DRC Adoptions

The DRC is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). U.S. citizen prospective adoptive parents wishing to initiate a non-Hague Convention adoption should submit the following forms:

  • Form  I-600A, Application for Advance Processing of an Orphan Petition
  • Form  I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative

USCIS processes these forms in accordance with applicable regulations, as they relate to orphans as defined under the Immigration and Nationality Act, Section 101(b)(1)(F).

U.S. prospective adoptive parents should expect significant delays of uncertain duration in the DRC adoption process due to the suspension on the issuance of exit permits.  There are also significant delays in the issuance of DRC passports to these children, and visa interviews at the U.S. Embassy cannot be conducted unless the adopted child has a Congolese passport.  While we cannot predict when or if adopted children will be able to depart the DRC, U.S. families with an approved Form I-600A may choose to maintain the validity of a current Form I-600A approval for the DRC or choose to pursue adoption in another non-Hague Adoption Convention country or a Hague Adoption Convention country.  Please see the Department of State’s Adoption Notice recommending that prospective adoptive families do not start a new adoption in the DRC at this time.   

If a U.S. citizen has an approved Form I-600A for the DRC and wishes to change to another country that is not party to the Hague Adoption Convention, the applicant must:

  • Notify USCIS in writing of his or her intention; and
  • Submit an amended home study that is no more than six months old. See also the USCIS Universal Accreditation Act (UAA) webpage for information on how the UAA may impact an amended home study.

If a U.S. citizen wishes to change to a country that is a party to the Hague Adoption Convention, the applicant must:

  • File Form I-800A, Application for Determination of Suitability to Adopt a Child from a Convention Country, along with a Hague-compliant home study and the appropriate fee.

If a U.S. citizen wishes to maintain his or her approved Form I-600A for the DRC, he or she can request a one-time, no fee extension prior to the expiration of an approved Form I-600A for an additional 18 months by:

  • Requesting an extension of approval with USCIS in writing;
  • Submitting an amended or updated home study as appropriate, and

Note:  Prospective adoptive parents may also be asked to submit additional documentation.

Eligibility of an Adopted Child Living in the DRC to Obtain U.S. Citizenship

I adopted a child in the DRC and have an approved Form I-600, but cannot obtain an exit permit for my adopted child to leave the DRC and immigrate to the U.S.  Can my adopted child acquire U.S. citizenship while in the DRC, before coming to the U.S.?

No. Children adopted by United States citizen parents generally cannot obtain U.S. citizenship until they enter the United States.  See Sections 320 and 322 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). In order for an adopted child living in the DRC, to acquire U.S. citizenship, he or she would need to meet the requirements of Section 322 of the INA.  To be eligible under this provision, the INA requires that a child adopted from a non-Hague convention country such as the DRC, must:

  • Meet the definition of an “orphan” under INA Section 101(b)(1)(F), evidenced by an approved Form I-600 petition;
  • Have at least one U.S. citizen parent (by birth or naturalization);
  • Have at least one U.S. citizen parent (or U.S. citizen grandparent, if applicable) who meets certain physical presence requirements (specifically s/he has been present in the United States or its outlying possessions for at least five years, which includes at least 2 years after reaching 14 years of age);
  • Be under 18 years of age;
  • Be residing outside of the United States in the legal and physical custody of the U.S. citizen parent (unless the U.S. citizen parent is deceased);
  • Be temporarily present in the United States (through the child’s appearance at a domestic USCIS office) pursuant to a lawful admission, and maintains such status (note there is an exception for adopted children of U.S. Armed Forces members authorized to accompany such member and reside together abroad); and
  • Take the oath of allegiance before a USCIS officer in the United States (unless waived for children under the age of 14).

If the child meets the criteria for citizenship under INA Section 322 parents must file Form N-600K on behalf of an adopted child and include a copy of a final adoption decree, along with a copy of the Form I-600 petition approval notice and supporting documents (except home study) in order to obtain citizenship for the child.  The Form N-600K application must be filed and completely processed before the child’s 18th birthday. 

Due to the suspension of exit permits, however, an adopted child living in the DRC would generally not be able to fulfill all the statutory requirements; specifically temporary presence in the U.S. pursuant to a lawful admission.  Adopted children may have been issued an IR-3 visa from the Department of State; however, due to the restriction on the issuance of exit permits adopted children would be unable to travel to the U.S. to attend the required USCIS interview. 

For similar reasons, children living in the DRC would generally not be able to fulfill all the statutory requirements under INA Section 320, which among other conditions requires that the adopted child be residing in the U.S. in the legal and physical custody of the citizen parent pursuant to a lawful admission for permanent residence. 

If I or my spouse are a member of the Armed Services stationed abroad, can my adopted child living in the DRC obtain U.S. citizenship?

Children of U.S. citizen military members who are authorized to accompany and reside with their U.S. citizen military parent abroad pursuant to official orders are not required to be temporarily present in the U.S. to acquire citizenship under section 322 of the INA.  Such children may be able to complete the process to obtain a Certificate of Citizenship abroad. Additionally, a U.S. citizen parent who is a member of the armed forces may count any period of time he or she resided abroad on official orders as physical presence in the United States.

In order to demonstrate the adopted child is authorized to accompany and reside with the U.S. military parent, the adoptive parent(s) should submit a copy of the Permanent Change of Station (PCS) orders specifically naming the child on the orders.  If the PCS orders do not specifically name the child, the parent must also include a copy of the service member’s Form DD-1278 (Certificate of Overseas Assignment to Support Application to File Petition for Naturalization) and​  Form DD-1171 (DEERS Enrollment), naming the child. 

The child must be residing with and accompanying the U.S. citizen service member who is on official military orders.  A military spouse living with an adopted child in a location or country not listed on the military orders would not satisfy the necessary requirement.

Importantly, even though a child in these circumstances may be able to obtain a Certificate of Citizenship, the child would still need to obtain an exit permit from the DGM to leave the DRC.

Timeline of DRC Suspension on the Issuance of Exit Permits

September 25, 2013

The DGM suspended issuance of exit permits to adopted Congolese children.

October 22, 2013

The DGM clarified the limited exceptions to the suspension of exit permit issuance referred to in the Department of State’s October 8, 2013, adoption notice.

May 26, 2014

The DGM announced the approval of 62 exit permits for adopted children (out of 458 pending applications). Of the approved exit permits, 15 were issued to children adopted by U.S. families.

May 27, 2014

Department of State posted an adoption alert stating the DGM cautioned that children adopted by foreigners will not be issued exit permits until a new law reforming intercountry adoptions enters into force, even if their cases met the DGM’s previous exception criteria. The Congolese authorities have not committed to a particular timeframe in which they expect to develop and implement any new law(s).

July 10, 2014

The DGM clarified that no children adopted by foreigners will be issued exit permits (including children with medical conditions and those whose cases met the DGM’s October 2013 exception criteria) until the DRC drafts and implements a new law reforming intercountry adoptions. 

September 26, 2014

The DGM announced that the suspension on the issuance of exit permits will remain in effect until further notice. 

 

Stricter Scrutiny of U.S. Adoptive Families’ Adoptions and Applications for Visas to Travel to the DRC

The Department of State posted an alert on April 28, 2014, that addressed reasons provided by Congolese officials for increased scrutiny, and possible denial, of visa applications by U.S. adoptive families intending to travel to the DRC.

Prohibitions on Adoptions Under Congolese Law

Congolese laws do not allow:

  1.  adoptions by gay or lesbian individuals or families;
  2.  adoptions by couples married less than five years;
  3.  adoptions by families with more than two children in the home;
  4.  adoptions of more than three Congolese children, even if the children are part of a family group;
  5.  adoptions by individuals with prior histories of child abuse and/or mental illness;
  6.  adoptions by single individuals of children of the opposite gender, and
  7.  adoptions where the adoptive parents are not at least 15 years older than the proposed adoptee.

According to Congolese law, no waivers are available for categories 1, 2, 4, and 5. As far as the Department of State understands, only the DRC president may waive the prohibitions against categories 3 and 6 and the Tribunal pour Enfants may waive requirement 7.

USCIS also understands that while Congolese courts may choose to waive some of these requirements when processing an adoption, other Congolese ministries may not recognize or accept the courts’ waivers. Adoptive families who complete adoptions in which the courts have waived requirements may encounter difficulties when seeking documents or approvals from other ministries.

Prohibition on Adoptions by Single Parents 

The DGM informed the U.S. Embassy in Kinshasa on October 22, 2013, that it will no longer issue exit permits to Congolese children adopted by single parents from all countries, unless the adoption was approved by the Ministry of Gender and Family before Sept. 25, 2013. This prohibition, announced in the Oct. 23, 2013, Department of State DRC adoption alert, is intended to be permanent. The U.S. Embassy in Kinshasa is seeking clarification on the prohibition’s impact on children whose adoptions by U.S. families were already completed in the DRC before the suspension.

 

For questions regarding cases filed with the USCIS National Benefits Center, families may email NBC.Adoptions@dhs.gov or call 877-424-8374.

For further information, please see the Department of State’s website adoption.state.gov, and search for or select the Democratic Republic of the Congo from the country list. Please pay attention to the alerts that are posted on the DRC page and to the DRC frequently asked questions

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Asylum Division Quarterly Stakeholder Meeting

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) invites you to participate in a quarterly
stakeholder engagement in Washington, D.C., on Friday, Nov. 14, 2014, from 1:30 to 3 p.m. (EST)
to provide updates from the Asylum Division and answer questions from participants.


To Register:


Interested parties may participate in this event in-person only. Please RSVP for this event no later
than Friday, Nov. 7, 2014, by emailing the Public Engagement Division at
Public.Engagement@uscis.dhs.gov. Please provide your full name and the name of any organization
you represent in the body of the email and write “Asylum Quarterly RSVP” in the subject line.


Once we process your registration, you will receive a confirmation email with additional details. On
the day of the engagement, please bring government-issued photo identification and plan to arrive
at least 15 minutes early in order to pass through security.


To Submit Questions or Agenda Items:


We encourage you to submit questions and agenda items before the engagement by emailing us at
Public.Engagement@uscis.dhs.gov. Please submit all questions and agenda items by Thursday, Oct.
23, 2014.
Please write “Asylum Quarterly Agenda Item” in the subject line of your email.


If you have any questions regarding the registration process, or if you have not received a
confirmation email within two business days of registering, please email us at
Public.Engagement@uscis.dhs.gov.


We look forward to engaging with you!

 

Meeting Invitation

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Teleconference Invitation Haitian Family Reunification Parole (HFRP) Program

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) invites you to participate in a teleconference on Wednesday, Oct. 22, from 2:00 to 2:45 p.m. (Eastern) to discuss the implementation of a limited Haitian Family Reunification Parole (HFRP) program.


Under this program, certain Haitians in Haiti who are beneficiaries of approved family-based immigrant visa petitions may be considered for parole to come to the United States up to two years before their immigrant visa priority dates become current.


During this teleconference, USCIS officials will provide an overview and address questions about the HFRP program.


To join the session by phone
On the day of the session, please use the information below to join the teleconference. We recommend that you call in 10 to 15 minutes before the start time.


Toll-free call-in number: 1-888-972-4308


Toll number if you are calling from outside of the U.S.: 1-312-470-7184


Passcode: HFRP


If you have any questions, please email us at Public.Engagement@uscis.dhs.gov.


We look forward to engaging with you!

 

Meeting Invitation

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DHS pral entrodwi Pwogram Reyinifikasyon Familyal an Libète Siveye

English version

WASHINGTON—Apati kòmansman ane 2015, Depatman Sekirite Teritwa Etazini [Department of Homeland Security (DHS)] pral kòmanse egzekite yon Pwogram Libète sou Kondisyon pou Reyinifikasyon Fanmi Ayisyen [Haitian Family Reunification Parole (HFRP)] pou fasilite reyinifikasyon pou sèten manm fanmi ayisyen sitwayen ameriken ak moun ki gen grinkat Etazini epitou pou ankouraje migrasyon san pwoblèm, legal ak annòd ant Ayiti ak Etazini.

Anba pwogram sa a, Sèvis Sitwayènte ak Imigrasyon Etazini [U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)] pral ofri sèten Ayisyen ki gen petisyon fanmi fè pou viza imigran yo ki apwouve, k ap viv an Ayiti nan moman an, yon posiblite pou yo vini nan Etazini pou apeprè dezan anvan dat pou yo resevwa viza imigran yo rive.

Sekretè-Adjwen Sekirite Terita Alejandro Mayorkas te declare: “Rekonstriksyon ak devlopman yon Ayiti ki san danje ak solid ekonomikman se yon priyorite pou Etazini.  Sekretè Adjwen Homeland Security, Alejandro Mayorkas, di konsa, “Pwogram Libète sou Kondisyon pou Reyinifikasyon Fanmi Ayisyen ap ankouraje yon objektif sistèm imigrasyon nou anba-anba – reyinifikasyon fanmi.  Li sipòte tou pi gwo objektif Etazini pou rekonstwiksyon ak devlopman Ayiti lè li bay posiblite pou sèten Ayisyen kalifye imigre san pwoblèm epi legalman nan Etazini pi bonè.   Etazini dekouraje moun ki an Ayiti yo toutbon pou yo fè vwayaj nan lanmè ki menase lavi yo epi ki ilegal pou yo vini nan Etazini. Moun sa yo p ap kalifye pou pwogram HFRP an epi si yo localize nan lanmè yopral voye yo tounen ann Ayiti.” 

Otorite legal pou pwogram HFRP an òganize anba Lwa Imigrasyon akNasyonalite ki otorize Sekretè Sekirite Teritwa a mete an libète siveye Ozetazini sèten moun, ka pa ka, pou rezon imanitè ijan oswa si se nan enterè jeneral la.  Se menm otorite legal la yo itilize pou etabli Pwogram Reyinifikasyon Familyal Kiben an Libète Siveye nan lane 2007.

USCIS p ap aksepte alèkile okenn aplikasyon pou pwogram HFRP epi benefisyè potansyèl yo pa ta dwe fè okenn demach koulye a. USCIS ap bay tout detayyo anvan fen lane sivil la epi angajman pati prenant yo pral dewoule yon ti tan apre sa. Nan kòmansman ane 2015, Sant Nasyonal Viza [National Visa Center (NVC)] Depatman-Deta (Department of State) pral kòmanse kontakte sèten sitwayen ameriken oswa moun ki gen grinkat ki gen petisyon yo apwouve pou manm fanmi ayisyen yo, pou bay yo posiblite pou yo aplike pou pwogram nan, epitou pou bay yo enstriksyon sou fason pou yo aplike. Se sèlman moun ki resevwa yon avi alekri NVC voye ki di yo elijib pou pwogram la ki pral elijibpou aplike.

Nan kad Pwogram Reyinifikasyon Familyal Ayisyen an Libète Siveye, Ayisyen otorize ki an libète siveye ap gen dwa antre Ozetazini epi y ap ka aplike pou otorizasyon travay men yo p ap resevwa estate rezidan pèmanan yo pi vit.  Al gade nan www.uscis.gov/avoidscams pou jwenn konsèy sou fason pou ranpli fòm, denonse zak ilegal epi jwenn sèvis jiridik ki kalifye. Sonje – Move Èd la Kapab Fè Ou Ditò! Yon tiliv brochure ak yon  disponib tou nan www.uscis.gov.

Pou plis enfòmasyon sou USCIS ak program li yo vizite www.uscis.gov oswa swiv nou nan Twitter (@uscis), Youtube (/uscis), Facebook (/uscis), ak USCIS blòg The Beacon

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DHS s’apprête à mettre en œuvre un Programme d’exceptions pour le regroupement des familles haïtiennes

English version

WASHINGTON—Dès le début de l’année 2015, le Ministère de la Sécurité intérieure (Department of Homeland Security ou DHS) mettra en œuvre un Programme d’exceptions pour le regroupement des familles haïtiennes (HFRP) afin de procurer l’opportunité d’une migration d’Haïti qui soit sûre, légale et dans l’ordre pour certains membres éligibles de la famille de citoyens américains et de résident permanent qui sont légales aux États-Unis.

Dans le cadre de ce programme, qui ne fonctionnera que sur invitation, les Services américains de la Citoyenneté et de l’Immigration (U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services ou USCIS) offriront à certains bénéficiaires Haïtiens éligibles et ayant reçu l’approbation de leurs demandes de visa d’immigration basée sur leur situation familiale, une occasion de venir aux États-Unis jusqu’à deux ans en avance de la prise d’effet des dates de priorité de leur visa d’immigration.

« La reconstruction et le développement d’une Haïti sûre et économiquement solide constitue une priorité pour les États-Unis.  Ce programme fournira l’occasion à certains Haïtiens éligibles d'immigrer légalement et en toute sécurité aux États-Unis, favorisera l’unité familiale – un but fondamental et sous-jacent de notre système d’immigration – et soutiendra des objectifs américains plus vastes concernant la reconstruction et le développement au long terme d’Haïti », a déclaré le Secrétaire adjoint de la Sécurité intérieure, Alejandro Mayorkas. 

Le programme HFRP reçoit son autorité juridique dans la Loi sur l’Immigration et la Nationalité autorisant le Secrétaire de la Sécurité nationale à accorder l’entrée exceptionnelle aux États-Unis à certaines personnes, au cas par cas, pour des raisons  humanitaires urgentes ou d’un avantage public important.  Il s’agit de la même autorité juridique qui fut utilisée en 2007 pour établir le programme d’exceptions pour le regroupement des familles cubaines.

À l’heure actuelle, USCIS n’accepte pas de demandes basées sur le programme HFRP et les bénéficiaires éventuels ne doivent rien entreprendre pour l’instant. USCIS fournira tous les détails du programme d’ici la fin de cette année calendaire et les engagements des intervenants auront lieu peu de temps après. Au début de 2015, le Centre national de visa (NVC) du Département d’État (DOS) commencera à contacter certains citoyens américains ou résidents permanents légaux ayant reçu l’approbation de leurs demandes pour les membres de leur famille haïtienne, leur offrant la possibilité de se porter candidats au programme et leur fournira des consignes sur comment en faire la demande. Seuls ceux qui recevront un avis écrit du NVC, signifiant leur éligibilité au programme, seront qualifiés pour s’y porter candidats.

Dans le contexte du Programme d’exceptions pour le regroupement des familles haïtiennes, les Haïtiens qui recevront cette exception auront le droit d’entrer aux États-Unis et de faire leur demande de permis de travail, mais l’état de résident permanent ne leur sera pas accordé plus tôt pour autant.   Consulter  www.uscis.gov/avoidscams pour des conseils sur comment remplir les formulaires, signaler les arnaques et trouver des services juridiques accrédités. Souvenez-vous, une assistance inappropriée peut porter préjudice !Une brochure d’information et un  dépliant sont également disponibles à www.uscis.gov.

Pour un complément d’information sur USCIS et ses programmes, veuillez consulter www.uscis.gov ou nous suivre sur Twitter (@uscis), YouTube (/uscis), Facebook(/uscis), et sur le blog d’USCIS The Beacon

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DHS To Implement Haitian Family Reunification Parole Program

WASHINGTON—Starting in early 2015, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) will begin implementation of a Haitian Family Reunification Parole (HFRP) Program to expedite family reunification for certain eligible Haitian family members of U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents of the U.S. and to promote safe, legal and orderly migration from Haiti to the United States.

Under this program U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will offer certain eligible Haitian beneficiaries of already approved family-based immigrant visa petitions, who are currently in Haiti, an opportunity to come to the United States up to approximately two years before their immigrant visa priority dates become current.

“The rebuilding and development of a safe and economically strong Haiti is a priority for the United States.  The Haitian Family Reunification Parole program promotes a fundamental underlying goal of our immigration system – family reunification.  It also supports broader U.S. goals for Haiti’s reconstruction and development by providing the opportunity for certain eligible Haitians to safely and legally immigrate sooner to the United States,” said Deputy Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas.  “The United States strongly discourages individuals in Haiti from undertaking life-threatening and illegal maritime journeys to the United States. Such individuals will not qualify for the HFRP program and if located at sea may be returned to Haiti.” 

Legal authority for the HFRP program is provided under the Immigration and Nationality Act which authorizes the Secretary of Homeland Security to parole into the United States certain individuals, on a case-by-case basis, for urgent humanitarian reasons or significant public benefit.  This is the same legal authority used to establish the Cuban Family Reunification Parole program in 2007.

USCIS is not currently accepting HFRP program applications, and potential beneficiaries should not take any action at this time.  USCIS will provide full program details before the end of this calendar year and stakeholder engagements will take place shortly thereafter. In early 2015, the Department of State National Visa Center (NVC) will begin contacting certain U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents with approved petitions for Haitian family members, offer them the opportunity to apply to the program, and provide instructions on how to apply. Only individuals who receive a written notice of program eligibility from NVC will be eligible to apply.

Under the Haitian Family Reunification Parole program, Haitians authorized parole will be allowed to enter the United States and apply for work permits but will not receive permanent resident status any earlier.  Visit www.uscis.gov/avoidscams for tips on filing forms, reporting scams, and finding accredited legal services. Remember, the Wrong Help Can Hurt! An informational brochure and flyer are also available on www.uscis.gov.

For more information on USCIS and its programs, please visit www.uscis.gov or follow us on Twitter (@uscis), YouTube (/uscis), Facebook(/uscis), and the USCIS blog The Beacon

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USCIS Language Access Stakeholder Engagement

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Director León Rodríguez invite you to participate in a stakeholder engagement on Friday, Oct. 24, from 1 to 3 p.m. (Eastern) to discuss DHS’ language access efforts, obtain feedback and answer questions from participants.


The DHS Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties recently posted Component Draft Language Access Plans, including U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). The plans provide a framework for the Department’s efforts to improve the delivery of language services for diverse communities across the country.


To Join the Session In-Person:


To attend this meeting in-person, please email CRCLOutreach@hq.dhs.gov by Oct. 20, and include “Language Access” in the subject line. You may send written comments until Oct. 31, using the same email address and subject line.


Once we process your registration for the meeting, you will receive a confirmation email with additional details. On the day of the engagement, please bring government-issued photo identification and plan to arrive at least 15 minutes early in order to pass through security.


To Join the Session by Phone:


On the day of the session, please use the information below to join the teleconference. We recommend that you call 10 to15 minutes before the start time.


Toll-Free Call-in Number: 1-888-455-3620
Passcode: DHS


We look forward to engaging with you!

 

Meeting Invitation

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Temporary Protected Status Extended for Honduras

WASHINGTON—Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson has extended Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for eligible nationals of Honduras for an additional 18 months, effective Jan. 6, 2015, through July 5, 2016.

Current TPS Honduras beneficiaries seeking to extend their TPS must re-register during the 60-day re-registration period that runs from Oct. 16, 2014 through Dec. 15, 2014. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) encourages beneficiaries to re-register as soon as possible once the 60-day re-registration period begins. USCIS will not accept applications before Oct. 16, 2014.

The 18-month extension also allows TPS re-registrants to apply for a new Employment Authorization Document (EAD). Eligible TPS Honduras beneficiaries (or persons without nationality who last habitually resided in Honduras) who re-register during the 60-day period and request a new EAD will receive one with an expiration date of July 5, 2016.

To re-register, current TPS beneficiaries must submit Form I-821, Application for Temporary Protected Status. Re-registrants do not need to pay the Form I-821 application fee, but they must submit the biometric services fee (or a fee-waiver request) if they are age 14 or older. All TPS re-registrants must also submit Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization. TPS re-registrants requesting an EAD must submit the Form I-765 application fee or a fee-waiver request. If the re-registrant does not want an EAD, no application fee is required.

Applicants may request that USCIS waive the Form I-765 application fee or biometrics fee based on an inability to pay by filing Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver, or by submitting a written request. Fee-waiver requests must be accompanied by supporting documentation. USCIS will reject the TPS application of any applicant who fails to submit the required filing fees or a properly documented fee-waiver request.

All USCIS forms are free. Applicants can download these forms from the USCIS website at www.uscis.gov/forms or request them by calling USCIS toll-free at 1-800-870-3676.

Additional information on TPS for Honduras—including guidance on eligibility, the application process and where to file—is available online at http://www.uscis.gov/tps. Further details about this extension of Honduras for TPS, including application requirements and procedures, are available in the Federal Register notice published today.

Applicants seeking information about the status of their individual cases can check My Case Status Online, or call the USCIS National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833).

For more information about USCIS and its programs, please visit www.uscis.gov or follow us on Twitter (@uscis), YouTube (/uscis) and the USCIS blog The Beacon

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