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USCIS Website, E-Verify Now Optimized for Mobile Devices

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WASHINGTON—U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) today announced a series of enhancements to make its website and online products easier to use on mobile devices.

Visitors will find uscis.gov and the Spanish site uscis.gov/es easier to read and use because the content now automatically adjusts to fit the screen of a smartphone, tablet, laptop or desktop computer.

The agency’s move to mobile-responsive design includes the E-Verify program, as well as USCIS’ new digital assistant Emma.

“As technology progresses, digital platforms can no longer take a one-size-fits-all approach,” said USCIS Director León Rodríguez. “We listened to our customers. Significant numbers access our site and services through mobile devices. These changes will make a big difference in improving their online experience.”

About 30 percent of visitors to the English site and more than 50 percent visiting the Spanish site now use a mobile device.

Among the improvements:

  • Menu options now collapse for easier viewing on smaller screens or browser windows.
  • Users will find it easier to access SAVE CaseCheck from mobile devices to check whether immigration status queries submitted by benefit-granting agencies are complete.
  • Enhancements to E-Verify make logging in and viewing cases quicker and more efficient.  Many of these ideas came from customer submissions through the E-Verify Listens website. These include case creation screens that now replicate the order of fields on Form I-9.

These improvements are part of a USCIS commitment to use technology and innovation to meet the evolving needs of its customers, and a step toward a fully electronic immigration system.

For more information on USCIS and its programs, visit uscis.gov or follow us on Twitter (@uscis), YouTube (/uscis) and the USCIS blog The Beacon.

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