Filipino World War II Veterans Parole Program

*This page is also available in Tagalog.

ALERT: USCIS will continue the Filipino World War II Veterans Parole (FWVP) program.

USCIS will continue the Filipino World War II Veterans Parole (FWVP) program. DHS has reversed its 2019 announcement that it would terminate this program.

  • If you are a current parolee, please read the Current Parolees in the United States section below for important information on time-sensitive steps.
  • We are accepting new FWVP Program applications. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has caused significant processing delays. We cannot predict whether you would join your family faster under the FWVP program versus through the immigrant visa process. We encourage you to monitor the local U.S. embassy’s website regarding immigrant visa processing and other routine services, including FWVP case processing.

The FWVP program was established in June 2016 to allow certain Filipino World War II veterans and their U.S. citizen and lawful permanent resident spouses to apply for parole for certain family members. If approved for parole, family members could come to the United States before their immigrant visas became available.

Current Parolees in the United States

Parole is not an immigrant visa and it is not the same as having a Green Card (lawful permanent resident status). Parole is temporary and allows you to be lawfully present in the United States during your parole period and to apply for work authorization.

You can see when your parole period expires on your electronic Form I-94, Arrival/Departure Record.

Applying for Lawful Permanent Resident Status/Green Card

We expect individuals paroled under the FWVP program to apply for a Green Card as soon as their immigrant visa is available. Based on information in the Visa Bulletin, it may be many years before visas for FWVP beneficiaries will become current. It is your responsibility to keep track of when your immigrant visa becomes available. We do not send you a notice to alert you when your immigrant visa is available, nor do we track if any derivative beneficiaries have “aged out” of their eligibility for a Green Card and may need a new petition filed on their behalf. (See our Child Status Protection Act (CSPA) page for more information.)

Please see the information in English or Tagalog on how to check if your immigrant visa is available.

If … Then…
  • Your immigrant visa is available;
  • Your parole period has not expired; and
  • You wish to remain in the United States permanently

You should apply for a Green Card by Filing Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status, along with filing any required forms and initial evidence, including but not limited to Form I-864, Affidavit of Support Under Section 213A of the INA.

You should consider requesting re-parole if your immigrant visa processing may not be complete by the time your parole period expires. If your parole period expires before you obtain an immigration status, and you have not requested or obtained re-parole, then you will not be eligible to adjust your status to become a permanent resident, even if your immigrant visa is available. You may accrue unlawful presence. (See the Unlawful Presence section below for more details.)

You filed Form I-485 and it is pending

You should consider requesting re-parole before your current parole period expires. If we reject or deny your Form I-485, then you may accrue unlawful presence if your parole period expires and you have not requested and been approved for re-parole or are not otherwise in a period of authorized stay. (See the Unlawful Presence section below for more details.)

You filed Form I-485 and we rejected or denied it

You may be in an unauthorized period of stay and you may be accruing unlawful presence if your parole period has expired and you have not requested or obtained re-parole. You should consider requesting re-parole. (See the Unlawful Presence section below for more details.)

Requesting Re-Parole

To request a new parole period (re-parole) you must:

  • File a new Form I-131, Application for Travel Document, and pay the required fee (or request a fee waiver);
  • Check box 1.f. in Part 2 of the form;
  • Write “FWVP re-parole” across the top of the application;
  • Include a new Form I-134, Affidavit of Support, and any evidence to support re-parole, including an explanation and supporting documents demonstrating why you need an additional authorized parole period; and
  • Mail your request to the address listed in the “Re-Parole” section on the Humanitarian Parole webpage
If … Then …
Your parole period is about to expire and you have not requested or obtained re-parole or an immigration status

You must request re-parole to remain in a period of authorized stay. We will consider re-parole requests on a case-by-case basis under the same terms of the former FWVP program. You should submit your request at least 90 days before your parole expiration date to allow time for processing.

Your parole period has already expired, but you have not requested re-parole or a Green Card and have not obtained an immigration status

You may not be in an authorized period of stay; however, you may still request re-parole. You should submit a complete request for re-parole as soon as possible. If we approve your request, you may be eligible to apply for a Green Card when your immigrant visa is available. However, if we deny your request, you may not be in an authorized period of stay and you may be accruing unlawful presence until you leave the country. (See the Unlawful Presence section below for more details.)

Unlawful Presence

Accruing unlawful presence in the United States can have serious immigration consequences:

  • You may not be able to get a Green Card if you have been in the United States unlawfully at any time since you arrived as a parolee. This means you would have to leave the United States to apply for an immigrant visa to return to the United States as a lawful permanent resident; and
  • If you have been in the United States unlawfully for more than 180 days and then depart the United States, you may be subject to an unlawful presence bar, depending on your age. This means you may not be allowed to return to the United States for either 3 or 10 years, depending on the period of your unlawful presence, unless you receive a waiver of inadmissibility. For more information, visit our Unlawful Presence and Bars to Admissibility page.
  • If you are subject to an unlawful presence bar, you may apply for a waiver by filing Form I-601A, Application for Provisional Unlawful Presence Waiver, before you leave the United States to appear at a U.S. embassy or U.S. consulate for an immigrant visa interview. For more information about applying for a waiver of inadmissibility after departing the United States, go to our Form I-601, Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility webpage.

You may also seek legal counsel or consult with an authorized immigration service provider regarding your situation.

Applying for Employment Authorization

After you are paroled into the United States under the FWVP program, you are eligible to apply for discretionary employment authorization from USCIS.

To apply for discretionary employment  authorization, you must submit Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization, with the required fee, or request a fee waiver by filing Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver.

If you ever worked without authorization in the United States, you may need to apply and be processed overseas for an immigrant visa instead of applying for a Green Card in the United States.

Terminating Your Parole

If you have already been paroled into the United States, your parole may automatically terminate if:

  • You depart the United States; or
  • Your parole period expires.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) may also decide to terminate your parole for other grounds, such as violating any laws of the United States.

At this time, if you have been paroled into the United States under the FWVP program, you will maintain parole until it expires and you can apply for re-parole, unless you are subject to grounds for termination under DHS regulations at 8 CFR section 212.5(e).

Applying for FWVP

This section includes information on-the following topics:

  • Definitions
  • Program Eligibility
  • How to Apply
  • Processing your Application
  • Beneficiary Interview
  • After the Interview

Definitions

We use the following terms in the FWVP Program:

Term Definition

Petitioner

The Filipino World War II (WWII) veteran or their surviving spouse who is a U.S. citizen or Green Card holder living in the United States. If the Filipino WWII veteran and their spouse are both deceased, certain beneficiaries of approved or reinstated Forms I-130 may request parole on their own behalf. This is called self-petitioning.

Only qualified petitioners can file applications for benefits under the FWVP program.

Beneficiaries

Family members who may benefit from the Form I-130 filed on their behalf and who may be paroled into the United States if we approve them under the FWVP program.

Beneficiaries include the principal beneficiary, derivative beneficiaries, and add-on derivative beneficiaries.

Principal beneficiary

The family member for whom a petitioner filed Form I-130.

For example, the principal beneficiary could be a lawful permanent resident’s spouse or unmarried child, or a U.S. citizen’s adult son, daughter, or sibling.

Derivative beneficiaries

The principal beneficiary’s spouse and unmarried children under age 21. They may also be listed on the approved Form I-130.

These beneficiaries may be eligible for parole based on their relationship to the principal beneficiary. If we do not approve the principal beneficiary for parole, we will not approve the derivative beneficiaries.

Add-on derivative beneficiary

If a principal beneficiary has married or had a child since we approved their Form I-130, that spouse or unmarried child under 21 may in some circumstances become an add-on derivative beneficiary and be eligible for parole based on their relationship to the principal beneficiary.

Program Eligibility

Who Is Eligible to Apply

You may request parole for your qualifying relatives if you meet the following requirements:

You may request parole on your own behalf and on behalf of your spouse and children (unmarried and under 21) if:

  • The veteran and spouse are both deceased; and
  • You are the son or daughter of the veteran and you are the principal beneficiary of the Form I-130 submitted by the veteran or by the veteran’s spouse.

Please see the Self-Petitioners subsection below for additional information.

Requirements for Requesting Parole

If you meet the requirements above, you may request parole on behalf of a family member who meets the following criteria:

  • They are the beneficiary on a Form I-130 filed by the veteran or the veteran’s surviving spouse, and we approved the form (which includes any accompanying spouse or child*) on or before the date the petitioner requested parole; and
  • The beneficiary has a qualifying, legally recognized relationship with the veteran that existed on or before May 9, 2016.

*The principal beneficiary’s spouse and unmarried children under age 21 (known as derivative beneficiaries) may also be eligible for benefits under the FWVP program. We will only consider derivative beneficiaries for parole if we approve the principal beneficiary. Derivative beneficiaries are not eligible for the FWVP program on their own.

If you are the veteran’s surviving spouse, your son or daughter may be eligible beneficiaries only if they are also the son or daughter of that veteran. This includes stepchildren, legitimated children, children born out of wedlock, and adopted children. You may request parole under the FWVP program on their behalf, even if the deceased veteran filed the approved Form I-130 on which they are beneficiaries, as long as we grant humanitarian reinstatement of that Form I-130 or grant relief under INA section 204(l). See our Humanitarian Reinstatement page for more information.

Expedited Processing of Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative

We will review an expedite request on a case-by-case basis as a matter of discretion, and the burden is on the petitioner to prove they meet one or more of the expedite criteria. See our Expedite Criteria page for more information. If you are a Filipino WWII veteran or the veteran’s surviving spouse and want to request expedited processing of your new Form I-130, include a cover letter with your Form I-130 indicating that you are the veteran or the surviving spouse, that you are interested in the FWVP program, and that you are requesting expedited processing. After you receive a receipt notice from us, you should also call the USCIS Contact Center (800-375-5283 within the United States or 212-620-3418 outside the United States, TTY 800-767-1833) to request expedited processing.

If we approve your Form I-130, you may file Form I-131 for your eligible beneficiaries with a copy of your Form I-797, Notice of Action (which is your Form I-130 approval notice), and other required documents listed in the How to Apply section.

We must approve your Form I-130 before you file Form I-131. You cannot file both forms together.

Self-Petitioners

If the veteran and the veteran’s spouse are both deceased, you may request parole on your own behalf, and on behalf of your spouse and minor children (unmarried and under 21), if you establish that:

  • The deceased veteran had qualifying WWII military service, as noted in the Who is Eligible to Request Parole section above, and was living in the United States at the time of death;
  • The veteran's spouse is also deceased; and
  • You are the son, daughter, brother or sister of the deceased veteran, and that relationship existed on or before May 9, 2016.

In addition, before we consider your request for parole, one of the following conditions must be true:

  • We approved the Form I-130 on which you are a principal beneficiary while the petitioner was alive, and then after the petitioner’s death, we granted reinstatement of the Form I-130 under 8 CFR 205.1(a)(3)(i)(C)(2) or granted relief under INA 204(l); or
  • If the petitioner died while their Form I-130 was pending, and the beneficiary or derivative beneficiary was living in the United States at the time of the petitioner’s death and is still living in the United States, we subsequently approved their Form I-130 under INA 204(l).

For more information on how to request humanitarian reinstatement of Form I-130, please see our Humanitarian Reinstatement page.

Because many individuals seeking parole as a family member of a Filipino war veteran are at an advanced age, you may call the USCIS Contact Center to request expedited processing for a pending humanitarian reinstatement request. Tell the representative that you will be requesting parole under the FWVP program.

You can only file Form I-131 after we approve your Form I-130. However, you may file Form I-131 together with a request for humanitarian reinstatement or while such a request is pending. If you file Form I-131 while a humanitarian reinstatement request is pending, include a copy of the pending request with your application packet.

We will not process your Form I-131 until we grant your request for humanitarian reinstatement.

For concurrent filing, be sure to include the following documents in your package:

  • A cover letter indicating you are filing Form I-131 and a humanitarian reinstatement request together;
  • The humanitarian reinstatement request completed by the Form I-130 principal beneficiary, with supporting documentation. (There is no separate fee to request humanitarian reinstatement.);
  • Form I-131 completed by the qualified FWVP petitioner, with supporting documentation and the required fee or fee waiver request;
  • The previously approved Form I-130; and
  • Form I-864, Affidavit of Support, filed by an eligible sponsor with required financial documentation. You do not need to also include Form I-134, Affidavit of Support. Do not substitute Form I-134 for the Form I-864.

FWVP Program Eligibility

Read this chart from left to right to determine who you are eligible to request parole for:

  • Column 1 refers to who you are – the Filipino World War II veteran, the veteran’s surviving spouse, or the veteran’s child, brother or sister;
  • Column 2 refers to the petitioner who filed the Form 1-130 that we approved. You cannot request parole without an approved Form I-130; and
  • Column 3 specifies who you can request parole for, based on who you are and who filed the approved Form I-130.
Who Are You? Who Filed Form I-130 That We Approved? Who Can You Request Parole For Under the FWVP Program?

A Filipino World War II (WWII) veteran whose military service has been recognized by the Department of Defense

You, the Filipino WWII veteran

Any of the beneficiaries of your approved Form I-130, as long as your relationship with them existed on or before May 9, 2016.

This may include your:

  • Sons and daughters and their spouses, and their unmarried children under 21 years of age; and
  • Brothers and sisters and their spouses, and their unmarried children under 21 years of age.

The surviving spouse of a Filipino WWII veteran whose military service was recognized by the Department of Defense

Your spouse, the Filipino WWII veteran, who is now deceased

Any of the beneficiaries of your veteran spouse’s Form I-130, as long as:

  • The veteran’s qualifying relationship with them existed on or before May 9, 2016; and
  • We approved their Form I-130 before your spouse died and then reinstated the approval either under 8 CFR 205.1(a)(3)(i)(C)(2) or granted relief under 204(l); or
  • We did not approve their Form I-130 before your spouse died, but at least one beneficiary was living in the United States at the time of the petitioner’s death and is still living in the United States, and we approved the Form I-130 under INA 204(l).

This may include the veteran’s:

  • Sons and daughters and their spouses, and their unmarried children under 21 years of age; and
  • Brothers and sisters and their spouses, and their unmarried children under 21 years of age.

You, the veteran’s surviving spouse

Certain beneficiaries of your approved Form I-130, as long as:

  • They are also your veteran spouse’s sons and daughters (including their spouses, and their unmarried children under 21); and
  • The veteran’s qualifying, legal relationship with them existed on or before May 9, 2016.

The following Form I-130 beneficiaries are not eligible for the FWVP program:

  • Your sons or daughters who are not also your veteran spouse’s sons or daughters; and
  • Your brothers or sisters, and their spouses and children.

The son, daughter, brother, or sister of a deceased Filipino WWII veteran whose military service was recognized by the Department of Defense, and the veteran’s spouse is also deceased

The Filipino WWII veteran or the veteran’s spouse, who are now both deceased

You are eligible to self-petition to the FWVP program on behalf of yourself and any qualifying derivatives as long as:

  • We approved the petitioner’s Form I-130 on which you are listed as a beneficiary before they died and then reinstated the approval either under 8 CFR 205.1(a)(3)(i)(C)(2) or granted relief under 204(l); or
  • We did not approve the petitioner’s Form I-130 before they died, but at least one beneficiary was living in the United States at the time of the petitioner’s death and is still living in the United States, and we approved the Form I-130 under INA 204(l);

AND

  • Your qualifying relationship with the Filipino WWII veteran existed on or before May 9, 2016; and
  • The veteran was residing in the United States at the time of their death.

You are not eligible to self-petition on your own behalf if:

  • We approved the petitioner’s Form I-130 before they died but have not reinstated the approval (in this case, the principal beneficiary may concurrently request humanitarian reinstatement);
  • We did not approve the petitioner’s Form I-130 before they died, and you have not been granted relief under INA 204(l); or
  • The Form I-130 petitioner is still living. (In this case, the petitioner must apply for the FWVP program on your behalf).

You are not eligible for the FWVP program if:

  • You are the son or daughter of the veteran’s spouse but not the son or daughter of the veteran; or
  • You are the brother or sister of the veteran’s spouse.

Family Members in the United States

While the FWVP program is primarily intended for family members outside of the United States, certain relatives in the United States may be able to benefit from the program. However, if a service center conditionally approves your application, your relative must leave the United States and appear abroad at a USCIS office or at a U.S. embassy or consulate, as indicated on the Form I-131, to be interviewed by a USCIS or Department of State officer.

If your relative is eligible to travel, they will receive a travel document allowing them to travel to the United States and request parole from a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officer at a port of entry. CBP will review the documents and, assuming all is in order, parole your relative into the United States. If they are not eligible to travel, we will send a written notification to the FWVP petitioner.

Depending on an individual’s status in the United States, a departure from the United States can come with serious immigration consequences. Before pursuing this option, we encourage you to consult with an authorized immigration service provider on the potential risks and benefits of this option.

Alternatively, certain family members in the United States may be eligible for parole in place or deferred action under our discretionary options for current or former military family members.

Who Is Not Eligible

Participation in the FWVP program is not available to individuals who qualify as immediate relatives, because they may immediately seek immigrant visas for travel to the United States once we approve their Form I-130. Immediate relatives include:

  • Spouses of U.S. citizens;
  • Unmarried children under 21 years of age of U.S. citizens; and
  • Parents of U.S. citizens over 21 years of age.

If you are the beneficiary of an approved Form I-130, and your petitioner (the Filipino WWII veteran or spouse) in the United States is still living, you cannot request parole for yourself or your family members under the FWVP program. Your U.S.-based petitioner must file on your behalf.

Age Limit for Derivative Beneficiaries

There is no age limit for a principal beneficiary of a Form I-130 to qualify for the FWVP program. However, any derivative children must be under the age of 21 on the date that we receive your properly filed request to be considered for parole under this program. We will deny any Form I-131 submitted for derivative children who are 21 years of age or older on the date we receive the properly filed application. We will not return the associated filing fees. We will continue to process the applications for any other beneficiaries, including the principal beneficiary and their spouse and unmarried children under 21.

Circumstances That Could Affect Eligibility

The table below lists circumstances that could affect your eligibility for the FWVP program.

Becoming a U.S. citizen

If you are a lawful permanent resident and become a U.S. citizen after you have properly filed your FWVP program application, you have two options:

  • You may choose to have your immediate relatives continue to be processed for parole. If they are paroled into the United States under the FWVP program, we expect them to apply for a Green Card after entering because immigrant visas are immediately available; or
  • You may choose to have your immediate relatives processed for immigrant visas at the U.S. embassy or consulate after they pay all applicable immigrant visa fees.

If you become a U.S. citizen before you request parole under the FWVP program, we will deny any applications filed on behalf of your immediate relatives.

Marriage

A change in the marital status of a Form I-130 beneficiary relative could affect your relative’s eligibility for the FWVP Program.

Married relatives who are not eligible for the FWVP program include:

  • A child for whom a Form I-130 was filed under the family-based second preference. The second preference is available to Green Card holders who wish to bring spouses and unmarried children to the United States, regardless of the age of the children. If your child has married since we approved the Form I-130, they are no longer a child under the INA and are not eligible to benefit from the visa petition; and
  • A child of the principal beneficiary you filed Form I-130 for, otherwise known as a derivative child. If the child has married since we approved the Form I-130, they are no longer a child under the INA even if they are under 21 years of age, and they may not derive status from the principal beneficiary.

How to Apply

Filing Tips

  • Petitioners (including self-petitioners) will be required to file FWVP program applications for all family members associated with the same underlying approved Form I-130 at the same time. We will only consider derivative beneficiaries for parole if we approve the principal beneficiary on the Form I-130 for parole. Derivative beneficiaries are not eligible for the FWVP program on their own, and we will deny any Form I-131 you file on their behalf if we do not approve the principal beneficiary for parole.
  • Requesting to add a spouse or child to an approved Form I-130 (add-on derivative beneficiaries): If a principal beneficiary married or had a child after we approved the underlying Form I-130, and the spouse and/or child could be considered an “add-on” derivative beneficiary in the immigrant visa context, you may file an FWVP program application on behalf of that principal beneficiary’s spouse or child under age 21.
  • Derivative children listed on the approved Form I-130 who are already, or who will be, 21 years of age or older before you properly file an FWVP program application will not be eligible for the FWVP program. We consider the date an application is filed as the date that we receive it. If you file an application on behalf of a derivate child and we receive it after the child has turned 21 years of age, we will deny your application.

How to Request Parole

If you (the petitioner or self-petitioner) want your relatives considered for the FWVP program, you must follow the FWVP program-specific application instructions listed below and submit the following required documentation to the lockbox:

  • Complete a separate Form I-131, Application for Travel Document, for each family member eligible to participate in the FWVP Program;
  • Complete parts 1, 2, 7, 8 and 9 of Form I-131;
    • Part 1 requests information about you, the petitioner (or self-petitioners).
    • Under Part 2, Application Type, check box 1.F, I am applying for an Advance Parole Document for a person who is outside the United States. (Check this box even if your beneficiary is currently residing in the United States);
    • Items 2.A-2.P request information about your family member, the beneficiary; and
    • Under Part 8, sign it yourself, as the petitioner (or self-petitioner);
  • Write “FWVP” in capital letters at the top of your Form I-131;
  • Include a copy of your Form I-797, Notice of Action, which is your Form I-130 approval notice; a printout from Case Status Online that shows the approval of a Form I-130; or other evidence of your Form I-130 approval; and
  • Include the applicable fee or fee waiver request. (You may request a fee waiver by submitting Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver. For more information, see our Fee Waiver Guidance page.);
  • If you are eligible to self-petition, you must also submit evidence to establish a qualifying family relationship with the deceased veteran and evidence of reinstatement or INA section 204(l) relief of your Form I-130;
  • Complete a separate Form I-134, Affidavit of Support, with supporting documents for each family member (including yourself, if you are a self-petitioner). You may submit Form-134 affidavits from multiple sponsors to show there is sufficient income or financial resources to support each family member.
    • Note: If you are filing your Form I-131 with a request for humanitarian reinstatement, you only need to include Form I-864. You do not need to complete Form I-134;
  • If you are concurrently filing a request for humanitarian reinstatement with your Form I-131, or a request for humanitarian reinstatement because we denied a previous request, you must include a request by the principal beneficiary of the Form I-130 petition and include all supporting documents as described above; and
  • Include evidence that you are either a Filipino WWII veteran, as described under section 405 of IMMACT 90, as amended by Section 112 of Department of Justice Appropriations Act, 1998, or are the surviving spouse of such individual.
    • If you are a self-petitioner, include evidence that you are the son, daughter, brother or sister of the deceased Filipino veteran, and that relationship existed on or before May 9, 2016; that the deceased Filipino veteran had qualifying WWII military service, as noted above, and was living in the United States at the time of death; and that the veteran’s spouse is also deceased.

Submitting Your Initial Application Packet

You must file for all eligible relatives associated with the same approved Form I-130 at the same time so we can process them together. Mail everything in one package to the USCIS Chicago Lockbox:

For U.S. Postal Service (USPS) delivery:

USCIS
P.O. Box 8500
Chicago, IL 60680-4120

For FedEx, UPS, and DHL deliveries:

USCIS
Attn: FWVP
131 S. Dearborn St., 3rd Floor
Chicago, IL 60603-5517

If you do not submit these applications together, it may affect our ability to determine eligibility, and we may deny all or some of the related applications.

You cannot file your application through our online filing system at this time.

Note: For re-parole requests, please see the section “Current Parolees in the United States.”

Costs

You must pay the fees for Form I-131, Application for Travel Document, for each application you submit for a family member, or you can apply for a fee waiver. There is no fee for Form I-134, Affidavit of Support. You must also cover all costs associated with attending an interview abroad, including completing a medical examination and traveling to the United States.

Processing Your Application

The grant of parole is not automatic. We will use our discretion to authorize parole on a case-by-case basis. We will only authorize parole to beneficiaries who meet the FWVP guidelines and also:

  • Pass criminal and national security background checks;
  • Pass a medical exam; and
  • Warrant a favorable exercise of discretion.

After you mail your package to the USCIS lockbox, we will forward it to a USCIS service center for adjudication. The service center will verify that you are qualified to submit the package and will review the documentation to determine whether your beneficiary may be qualified for parole. The service center may request additional evidence, deny, or conditionally approve your application.

If the service center conditionally approves your application, they will forward it to the Department of State’s National Visa Center (NVC). The NVC will transfer your case to the USCIS office or U.S. embassy or consulate abroad where your beneficiary relative will be interviewed.

If we deny your Form I-131, the decision is final. However, your beneficiary may still be eligible for immigrant visa processing based on the approved Form I-130 filed on their behalf. When the beneficiary’s immigrant visa becomes available, they can apply for an immigrant visa.

It may take approximately six months to process an FWVP application from the time we receive your application to receiving a travel document. The time required to reach a decision on a case will vary depending on the issues raised and whether we require additional evidence. Additionally, the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted our normal operations, including that of our overseas partners who assist with case processing. This means case processing may take longer than usual.

Request for Evidence

If the service center finds that your application lacks required evidence or that additional evidence or information is required, they will send you a Request for Evidence (RFE). You must provide the requested evidence, or establish that the evidence is not available and submit secondary evidence in its place. We may deny your application if you do not respond to the RFE within the required time frame.

Beneficiary Interview

Do not try to schedule an appointment directly with a USCIS international field office or a U.S. embassy or consulate. You will receive a notice when we have scheduled an interview appointment.

Depending on your location, you (the principal beneficiary) may be interviewed by a USCIS or Department of State consular officer at a U.S. embassy or consulate. After receiving the application from the NVC, USCIS or the Department of State will schedule an interview appointment and provide information regarding any pre-interview requirements, including instructions on completing a medical examination.

On the date of interview, USCIS staff or Department of State consular officers will interview all your eligible family members to verify identities and confirm eligibility for parole under the FWVP program.

Preparing for the Interview

On the date of their interview, all eligible family members should bring:

  • A government-issued form of identification;
  • Their passport;
  • Original civil documents supporting their eligibility for the program, in addition to certified English translations of these documents;
  • Medical examination results; and
  • A copy of their interview schedule appointment notice.

After the Interview

Beneficiaries should not take any permanent actions such as selling or buying property, terminating employment, or withdrawing from school until they have their FWVP program parole travel document in their hands.

If travel is approved:

  • U.S. embassy staff will issue the necessary travel documents. These documents allow beneficiaries to travel to the United States and request parole from a CBP officer at a port of entry. CBP will review the documents and, assuming all is in order, can decide to parole you into the United States in their discretion for three years;
  • All eligible family members must arrange and pay for their own travel; and
  • Once in the United States, we expect beneficiaries to apply for a Green Card as soon as their immigrant visa becomes available. See the Current Parolees in the United States section for more information.

If travel is not approved:

  • We will send a written notification to you and your family members if we do not approve travel to the United States.

If we deny parole:

  • Our decision to deny parole is final, and there is no right of appeal;
  • If we deny parole under the FWVP program, Form I-130 beneficiaries may still be eligible for immigrant visa processing based on the approved Form I-130 when their immigrant visa becomes available; and
  • In certain circumstances, the reason we denied parole may also cause us to revoke the approval of the beneficiary’s underlying Form I-130. If we revoke Form I-130 approval, the beneficiary will no longer be eligible for an immigrant visa. We will make these determinations on a case-by-case basis.

Humanitarian or Significant Public Benefit Parole

Individuals who are not eligible for the FWVP program and who have urgent humanitarian or significant public benefit reasons to come to the United States may be eligible to apply for parole under the standard parole process.

For more information on how to apply for parole through the standard parole process, see our Humanitarian or Significant Public Benefit Parole page.

Program History

The FWVP program was created in June 2016 in recognition of the contributions and sacrifices of Filipino veterans from World War II and their families. Certain Filipino World War II veterans and their spouses who are U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents may request parole for certain family members.

Although we announced in August 2019 our intention to end the FWVP program, we no longer plan to terminate the program.

Protecting Yourself from Fraud

It is helpful to remember:

  • USCIS and the Department of State strongly urge you and your family members to remain vigilant about the possibility of individuals who claim to be U.S. government representatives asking for money. These individuals, or “scammers,” may attempt to trick you into paying them by offering to help file applications for the FWVP program. To learn more about common immigration scams and how to report scammers, please visit our Avoid Scams page.
  • Websites ending in ".gov” are official government websites. Information on official U.S. government websites ending in “.gov” is official and correct. Official U.S. government email addresses also end in “.gov,” and you should be suspicious of any correspondence coming from an address that does not end with “.gov.”
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