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I-360, Petition for Amerasian, Widow(er), or Special Immigrant

Use this form to classify an alien as:

  • An Amerasian (born after Dec. 31, 1950, and before Oct. 23, 1982);
  • The widow(er) of a U.S. citizen;
  • A self-petitioning spouse or child of an abusive U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident under VAWA;
  • A self-petitioning parent of an abusive U.S. citizen under VAWA; or
  • A special immigrant. We define a special immigrant as one of the following:
    • Religious worker;
    • Panama Canal company employee, Canal Zone government employee, or U.S. government in the Canal Zone employee;
    • Physician licensed and practicing medicine in a U.S. state as of Jan. 9, 1978;
    • International organization or NATO-6 employee or family member;
    • Juvenile  who needs the protection of a juvenile court because they have been abused, neglected or abandoned by a parent;
    • U.S. armed forces member;
    • Afghan or Iraqi national who worked for or on behalf of the U.S. government as a translator;
    • Iraqi national who worked for or on behalf of the U.S. government in Iraq or
    • An Afghan national who worked for or on behalf of the U.S. government or the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Afghanistan; or
    • Broadcasters for the United States Agency for Global Media (USAGM) or for a USAGM grantee.

Other classifications not listed above may also be eligible to use Form I-360. Please read the form instructions for more information.

What This Form Can Help You Do

Forms and Document Downloads

Form Details

Edition Date

06/09/20. You can find the edition date at the bottom of the page on the form and instructions.

Dates are listed in mm/dd/yy format.

Where to File

Generally, if you reside in the United States, file at the Chicago, Dallas, or Phoenix Lockbox, depending on where you live and whether you are also filing Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status, at the same time (known as “concurrent filing”). For a complete list of addresses, visit our Direct Filing Addresses for Form I-360 page.

Self-Petitioning Spouses, Children, and Parents under VAWA
File your Form I-360 at the Vermont Service Center. For more information, visit our Direct Filing Addresses for Form I-360 page.

Special Immigrant Juveniles (SIJ)
File your Form I-360 at the Chicago Lockbox. For more information, visit our Direct Filing Addresses for Form I-360 page.

Religious Workers
You cannot file Form I-360 concurrently with a Form I-485. You may file Form I-485 only after we approve your Form I-360. See 8 CFR 245.2(a)(2)(B); Cf. Ruiz-Diaz v. United States, 703 F.3d 483 (9th Cir. 2012). 

Iraqi and Afghan nationals who worked for or on behalf of the U.S. government in Iraq or Afghanistan
You may scan and email your petition with the required documents (preferably in .pdf format) to nsci360sivapp@uscis.dhs.gov. Include the email address you want us to send your electronic receipt to. If you do not include an email address with your form, we will send the receipt notice electronically to the email address you used to submit your petition.

If you submit your petition by email, you must bring the same original, signed Form I-360 that you previously submitted with you to your consular interview.

Filing Tips: Go to our Form Filing Tips page for information on how to help ensure we will accept your form.

Don’t forget to sign your form. We will reject any unsigned form.

Filing Fee
$435.

However, you are exempt from paying the fee if you are: 

  • An Amerasian; (Box 1.A. on the form);
  • A self-petitioning abused spouse or child of a U.S. citizen or permanent resident under VAWA (Box 1.I. or Box 1.J. on the form);
  • A self-petitioning abused parent of a U.S. citizen under VAWA (Box 1.K. on the form);
  • A Special Immigrant Juveniles (Box 1.C. on the form); 
  • An Iraqi national who worked for or on behalf of the U.S. government in Iraq (Box 1.L. or Box 1.M. on the form); or
  • An Afghan national who worked for or on behalf of the U.S. government in Afghanistan (Box 1.L. or Box 1.N. on the form).

You may pay the fee with a money order, personal check, or cashier’s check. When filing at a USCIS lockbox facility, you may also pay by credit card using Form G-1450, Authorization for Credit Card Transactions. If you pay by check, you must make your check payable to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Service centers are not able to process credit card payments.

When you send a payment, you agree to pay for a government service. Filing and biometric service fees are final and non-refundable, regardless of any action we take on your application, petition, or request, or if you withdraw your request. Use our Fee Calculator to help determine your fee.

If you are required to pay a fee for your petition or are unable to submit your petition electronically, you may still follow the form instructions and submit the Form I-360 by mail.

Checklist of Required Initial Evidence (for informational purposes only)

View the checklist of required initial evidence.

Special Instructions

Attestation for Special Immigrant Religious Worker Classification
If you are filing Form I-360 for a special immigrant religious worker, you must submit the employer attestation in Form I-360. If applicable, you are also required to submit the religious denomination certification in Form I-360. See the form instructions for more information.

Widow(er)s of Deceased U.S. Citizens
At one time, section 201(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Immigration and Nationality Act said a citizen’s surviving spouse could file an immigrant visa petition if the citizen and surviving spouse had been married at least two years. On Oct. 28, 2009, section 568(c) of Pub. L. 111-83 amended the Immigration and Nationality Act so that you may be eligible to immigrate, even if you and your deceased spouse were married for less than two years when your spouse died. You must still file your Form I-360 no later than two years after your spouse’s death.

Your eligibility for classification as the widow(er) of a U.S. citizen based on a Form I-360 that you file after your citizen spouse died ends if you remarry before you immigrate or adjust status.

If your deceased citizen spouse filed a Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative, before they died, you do not need to file a Form I-360 because we automatically converted your spouse’s Form I-130 to a Form I-360. If your immigrant visa petition was originally filed as a Form I-130, your remarriage does not necessarily mean you cannot immigrate. Section 204(l) of the Immigration and Nationality Act allows us to approve the petition as a Form I-130, even if you have remarried.

E-Notification: If you want to receive an e-mail and/or a text message that we have accepted your form at a USCIS lockbox facility, complete Form G-1145, E-Notification of Application/Petition Acceptance and clip it to the first page of your petition.

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